Tag Archives: summer

Mini “lobster” rolls

26 Sep

Last week I had the pleasure of making a series of canapés at the launch of Le Creuset‘s new store in Stellenbosch. The first of these canapés were mini “lobster” rolls and they seemed to be a huge hit. I have to admit, I probably ate about 5 rolls in one sitting after this shoot – they are absolutely delicious with the chunky, sweet, cool prawn mixture and the soft, buttery, warm, toasty rolls that are slightly crunchy on the sides.

While original lobster rolls are obviously made with real lobster from the New England region in the USA, these little ones were made with prawn tails, lightly blanched to keep their beautifully firm, almost-crunchy texture. Note: West Coast rock lobsters are currently on SASSI’s red list, and so are Mozambican langoustines, so make sure you choose an option that is sustainable and safe to buy.

There are a few keys to the perfect “lobster” roll:

1) A regular soft hotdog roll should be slightly trimmed on the sides, then fried (on the cut sides) over low heat in butter for perfectly golden and crunchy sides (this mimics the classic lobster roll bun).

2) The roll should be cut and filled down the middle (not horizontally).

3) The meat should be cut into bold chunks, not shredded.

4) The filling should be just coated in mayonnaise, not swimming in it. A creamy mayonnaise like Hellmann’s is preferred.

5) Stick with a classic filling mixture: prawn/lobster meat, mayo, touch of lemon juice, chopped celery, chopped chives, touch of salt & pepper. Extras like sriracha sauce or lettuce are prohibited, according to the puritans.

I’ve added a few paper thin radish shavings, purely for garnish as I think it picks up the pink in the prawn meat beautifully and it doesn’t affect the flavour of the filling. It’s totally optional.

Ingredients: (makes around 36 mini rolls)

  • 800 g good quality frozen prawn tail meat, cleaned and peeled
  • water for boiling
  • 1/3 of a small jar (about 130 g of a 395 g jar) Hellmann’s mayonnaise
  • 10-15 ml fresh lemon juice
  • 1 celery stick, finely chopped
  • salt & pepper
  • about 36 cocktail hotdog rolls (about 10 cm long)
  • a small bunch chives, finely chopped
  • a few baby radishes, thinly shaved (optional)

Method:

Thaw the prawn meat by running it under cold water to loosen any thicker ice chunks, then leave it to stand at room temperature until ready (about 1-2 hours). Bring a large pot of water (filled with enough water to cover the prawn tails) to the boil, then drop the prawn tails in it and cover with a lid. When it comes to a boil again, cook for approximately 3-5 minutes or until just cooked, then drain immediately. Rinse briefly under cold water to stop it from cooking further, then drain thoroughly and roughly chop into chunks. Place the chopped meat in a large mixing bowl, then add the mayo, lemon juice and season with salt & pepper. Mix well, then taste and adjust seasoning. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use (this can be done a day in advance).

To prep the rolls, trim both sides (not ends) of the buns to a flat surface, then cut along the middle (but not right through). Fry the cut sides over low heat in butter until golden, then fill down the middle with the prawn filling. Sprinkle with chopped chives and garnish with a slice of radish. Serve at once.

Note: The rolls will feel very soft when they come from the pan – they will crisp up on standing, it only takes about a minute or two.

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Summer feasting with Pork 360: Chinese-style sticky ribs

29 Nov

Chinese ribs

Sticky Chinese-style spare ribs that fall from the bone (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

This is the second recipe in a series of six that I’ve created in collaboration with Pork 360 and Food Lover’s Market. As you might have seen, there’s a new stamp on some pork products in your favourite butcheries: Pork 360. It’s a quality assurance and traceability certification – a guarantee to both the consumer and retailing sector that the producer has a consistent production process that complies with minimum standards and ensures high-quality pork. The Pork 360 projects takes place under the guidance of the South African Pork Producers Association (SAPPO). Watch their video for more info.

In a nutshell: it’s pork you can trust!

This simple recipe for sticky Chinese-style pork spare ribs delivers big on the wow factor – glossy, sticky, dark and toasty pork ribs that will leave you licking your fingers. It works great on the braai but can easily also be cooked in an oven. Serve with a crunchy green salad and lots of paper towels (it’s a deliciously messy affair!).

Tip: Buy authentic Asian pantry ingredients in your local Food Lovers’ Market in the exotic section. This glaze is also great on chicken wings.

Ingredients: (serves 4-6)

  • 125 ml Hoisin sauce
  • 125 ml good quality soy sauce
  • 60 ml rice vinegar (or sherry vinegar)
  • 60 ml honey
  • 60 ml brown sugar
  • 30 ml grated/crushed garlic
  • 5 ml red food colouring (optional, but delivers an authentically Chinese result)
  • 10 ml Chinese 5-spice
  • 2 kg pork spare ribs
  • sesame seeds, for serving (optional)
  • spring onion, finely sliced, for serving (optional)

Method:

  1. Mix all the ingredients (except the ribs) together to form a thick, glossy, glaze.
  2. Place the ribs in a large pot and add enough water to cover the meat (cut the ribs in smaller sections if it doesn’t fit the pot). Pour over half the glaze and bring the water to a boil, covered with a lid.
  3. Cook the ribs for about 1 hour until it almost falls from the bone. Remove from the water and place in a large roasting tray (if you are going to cook them in the oven, line the tray with foil). Using a basting brush, brush the ribs generously with glaze on both sides.
  4. For the braai: Braai on both sides until dark and sticky, basting throughout. For the oven: roast at 220 C for 10 minutes at a time, basting throughout and turning them over when necessary. They should be ready in about 30 minutes. Serve immediately.
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Summer Feasting with Pork 360: BBQ pulled pork wraps with slaw, avo & sour cream

28 Nov

Easy BBQ pulled pork tortillas with sour cream, red cabbage slaw, avo and fresh coriander. So delicious! (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Easy BBQ pulled pork tortillas with sour cream, red cabbage slaw, avo and fresh coriander. So delicious! (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

I had the privilege of recently developing 6 new recipes with my favourite type of meat: pork. As you might have seen, there’s a new stamp on some pork products in your favourite butcheries: Pork 360. It’s a quality assurance and traceability certification – a guarantee to both the consumer and retailing sector that the producer has a consistent production process that complies with minimum standards and ensures high-quality pork. The Pork 360 projects takes place under the guidance of the South African Pork Producers Association (SAPPO). Watch their video for more info.

In a nutshell: it’s pork you can trust!

Over the next couple of weeks you can expect to see six tasty, easy, mouthwatering recipes for summer feasting, festive feasting and fresh feasting. It was a huge pleasure to cook with such great quality pork. I bought the meat (and other ingredients) from my friendly butcher at Food Lover’s Market. You can find the most beautiful, fresh, whole pork shoulders, necks, bellies and legs – great choices when entertaining a large crowd. They also have great spare ribs, chops and festive gammons.

My first recipe stems from one of my favourite street food classics: BBQ pulled pork. I’ve chosen a whole pork neck, bone-in – it is a lean and tender cut of meat that cooks to perfection for flaking purposes. Serve the saucy meat on toasted flour tortillas with avocado, red slaw, sour cream and lots of coriander. The best meal for a hot summer’s evening!

Ingredients: (serves 6)

  • 2,5 kg pork neck, bone-in
  • 30 ml olive oil
  • salt & pepper
  • 250 ml BBQ sauce / spare rib sauce
  • 250 ml water
  • 6 large flour tortillas, toasted in a hot, dry pan
  • 2 ripe avocados, roughly chopped
  • 250 ml sour cream
  • 3 cups red cabbage slaw (shredded slaw mixed with mayo & a squirt of lemon juice)
  • a bunch of fresh coriander
  • fresh lemon wedges, to serve

Method:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 180 C.
  2. Place the pork in a medium size roasting tray. Drizzle with oil, season generously with salt & pepper, then pour the BBQ sauce all over. Pour the water in the bottom of the tray, then cover with foil and roast for 3 hours.
  3. Remove the pork from the oven and use 2 forks to roughly shred the meat into strands. Remove any bones, then stir the meat to cover all over with the pan sauce.
  4. Serve hot on toasted flour tortillas with extra avo, sour cream, red cabbage slaw, fresh coriander and a squirt of lemon juice.

Tip: Add some freshly chopped chillies or jalapenos if you like it spicy!

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Raspberry Swirl Frozen Cheesecake

4 Nov

Photography by Tasha Seccombe.

Photography by Tasha Seccombe.

You might have noticed some brand changes going on with Simonsberg cheese: they’re becoming Président. You’d be happy to know that it’s still the same fantastic products with the same taste inside the packaging.

I recently had the privilege of dreaming up a new recipe with one of the cheeses in the President range. I chose their iconic plain cream cheese (preservative free), because I just love the texture and taste – wonderful in desserts, especially. Dishing up beautiful, creamy, swirly frozen desserts for the upcoming festive season is always a crowd pleaser. Without the trouble of making real ice cream or working with expensive churners, this velvety frozen cheesecake with raspberry jam swirls is easy to whip up, delicious to eat and delivers big on the wow factor.

Top with fresh raspberries and chopped nuts for a show-stopping dessert.

Top with fresh raspberries and chopped nuts for a show-stopping dessert (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Make it in a regular loaf tin brushed with vegetable oil and lined with plastic wrap. A layer of wafer biscuits complete the “ice cream cake” feel and keeps the cake from melting too quickly when you turn it out.

Ingredients:

  • 1 can of condensed milk
  • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (strained)
  • 2 x 230 g tubs Président cream cheese, plain
  • 250 ml Parmalat fresh cream
  • 1/2 cup good quality raspberry jam
  • about 8 wafer biscuits
  • fresh raspberries and chopped nuts, to serve

Method:

  1. Prepare a medium size loaf tin: brush the insides with vegetable oil and line with plastic wrap.
  2. Pour the condensed milk and lemon juice in a mixing bowl. Mix with electric beaters until thick and smooth.
  3. Add the cream cheese and mix until smooth.
  4. In a separate mixing bowl, whisk the cream until just stiff (don’t overmix). Fold the cream into the cream cheese mixture.
  5. Stir the jam well to make it a little runny. Swirl a few teaspoons full of jam on the bottom of the prepared tin, then top with one third of the cheesecake mixture. Repeat with more jam, more mixture, more jam and the last of the mixture.
  6. Arrange the wafer biscuits on top in a neat layer. Cover with plastic wrap and freeze overnight.
  7. To turn out, remove the top plastic wrap layer, then open up the plastic on the sides. Turn over on a serving plate/board, then tug gently on the plastic to release the cake from the tin. Remove the tin and the plastic and serve in slices with fresh berries and chopped nuts of your choice.

Note: I prefer serving this frozen cheesecake after leaving it on the counter for about 15 minutes to soften slightly.

Président cheese products

Photography by Tasha Seccombe.

Photography by Tasha Seccombe.

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PEPPADEW® Pasta Sauce Recipe: Chicken tikka masala marinade

7 Oct

Peppadew® chicken tikka masala marinade for super tender chicken sosaties (picture by Tasha Seccombe)

Peppadew® chicken tikka masala marinade for super tender chicken sosaties (picture by Tasha Seccombe)

I recently had the pleasure of creating a few new recipes for Peppadew®, using their convenient pasta sauce range. This first recipe is an easy tikka masala marinade for chicken, so fantastic for entertaining a crowd over the festive season – you just mix up all the ingredients and your marinade is ready to use.

Marinating boneless chicken in yoghurt and lemon juice is the secret to extra juicy, tender and delicious sosaties. This recipe contains all the right spices for a fragrant mild tikka sauce. Add extra chilli if you love things more spicy!

Prep time: marinating – minimum 3 hours, cooking – 10 minutes.

Serves: 6

You’ll need:

  • 1 jar Peppadew® Green Pepper & Garlic Pasta Sauce
  • 500 ml double cream unflavoured yoghurt
  • 60 ml fresh lemon juice
  • 30 ml vegetable oil
  • a knob of fresh ginger, peeled & finely grated
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled & finely grated
  • 5 ml ground coriander
  • 2,5 ml ground cumin
  • 5 ml ground turmeric
  • 30 ml garam masala
  • 10 ml salt
  • 5 ml freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 large boneless chicken breasts, cut into large cubes
  • 6 large or 12 medium sosatie sticks/skewers
  • a handful of fresh coriander, for garnish

Method:
In a large glass/ceramic/plastic bowl, mix all of the ingredients for the marinade together (except the chicken, sosatie sticks and fresh coriander).
Add the chicken cubes to the sauce and mix well to cover all over. Cover the bowl with a tight fitting lid or plastic wrap and leave to marinate in the fridge for at least 3 hours or overnight.
Bring the meat to room temperature by leaving it on the kitchen counter for an hour. Place the marinated cubes on your sosatie sticks, taking care not to overcrowd the sticks.
Braai the sosaties on a hot fire/grill, turning frequently to prevent burning. Braai until just done (do not overcook), then scatter with fresh coriander and serve hot.

Tips:
This marinade will also work very well for bone-in chicken pieces. Make small slits in the chicken pieces through the skin, so that the marinade can penetrate the meat. Braai the marinated chicken pieces over a medium hot fire for at least 40 minutes, turning frequently until cooked through and golden brown on both sides.

The versatile Peppadew® pasta sauce range.

The versatile Peppadew® pasta sauce range.

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Retro trout mousse

5 Jan

Light and creamy trout mousse with cucumber "scales" (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Light and creamy trout mousse with cucumber “scales” (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

A few years ago I came across a Church bazaar in Stellenbosch that specializes in selling used goods, almost like a “white elephant” table or a car boot sale. Many of the vendors had kitchenware at their stalls. I was amazed at this treasure cove filled with stuff that I could use for food styling and photography, but also for cooking.

It was a total blast from the past. I bought many different items, including a 60 year-old meat carving set with wooden handles (from an 82 year-old lady that got it as a wedding present back then), a crate filled with vintage Consol and Ball jars dating from the 1950’s (perfect condition), a 1970’s mandolin cutter (that would later chop off the tip of my finger) and a beautiful copper fish mould that looked like it had never been used.

I’ve used the copper mould a few times and absolutely fell in love with the retro-ness of it. I had a recipe for a salmon mousse that I adapted for using with fresh trout. After turning out the mousse on a plate, Tasha broke the news to me that she thought it was way too ugly and that we needed to make it look prettier (the mousse lost the scale patterns on the surface because I had to dip the mould in warm water from the outside to turn it out successfully). I then sliced some fresh cucumber with my mandolin cutter like they did back in the heydays of moulded fish dishes, and the result was quite astonishing to all of us. Totally retro, totally fabulous.

This is a great way of stretching one trout fillet into a crowd-pleasing starter. It is light and creamy and perfect for summer entertaining. Enjoy.

Ingredients:

  •  one fresh trout fillet, about 350g
  • 1 cup water
  • 20 ml (4 teaspoons) powdered gelatine
  • 1/2 cup cooled chicken stock
  • juice of a small lemon
  • a large handful of chives/dill/parsley, chopped
  • 250 g plain cream cheese
  • salt & pepper
  • 1 cup cream, whipped
  • thin cucumber slices and green leaves/microherbs, to serve

Method:

  1. Place the trout fillet and water in a saucepan and bring to a simmer. Close the lid and simmer for about 8 minutes until the trout is just cooked. Remove the fish from the water and leave to cool slightly, the remove the skin and bones and flake the meat.
  2. In a cup, mix the gelatine and chicken stock, then leave to sponge for 10 minutes. Transfer to a small saucepan and heat while stirring to melt the gelatine without boiling. When melted, remove from the heat to cool slightly.
  3. In the bowl of your food processor, add the flaked fish, cooled gelatine mixture, lemon juice, herbs and cream cheese. Process to a smooth pulp, then season generously with salt & pepper.
  4. Now add this mixture to the whipped cream and fold in gently to mix thoroughly. Transfer the mixture to your fish mould (sprayed with a non-stick spray), then cover with plastic wrap and leave to set in the refrigerator for 3-6 hours.
  5. To unmould, dip the mould on the outside in hot water for about 3 seconds, then carefully turn out on a large plate. Decorate with cucumber slices and greenery, then serve with crackers.
Trout mousse on melba toast (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Trout mousse on melba toast (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Credits:

This post was originally written for The Pretty Blog by Ilse van der Merwe from The Food Fox.

Recipe, food preparation and text: Ilse van der Merwe

Assistant: Elsebé Cronjé

Photography: Tasha Seccombe

Styling: Ilse van der Merwe & Tasha Seccombe

Venue for shoot: the demo KITCHEN

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Peach galette

28 Feb

Seasonal peach galette with vanilla ice cream (photography by Tasha Seccombe, styling by Nicola Pretorius)

Today is the last official day of summer in SA, so I’m going to sneak in one last sunny recipe. When summer fruit is abundant, there’s just no better way to use them than in a rustic French fruit galette (or crostata, like the Italians call it). The pastry is buttery and flaky, the fruit is tender and intense, and the result is just so much more than the sum of its original parts.

To make this galette even tastier, I make a batch of almond paste (marzipan) and coarsely grate this over the prepared pastry base before arranging the fruit. This adds a delicious soft and gooey aspect to the tart, as well as that almond flavour that I love so much. If you don’t like almonds, you can leave this out completely.

The recipe for the pastry comes from one of my food icons, Ina Garten. She had a specialty food store called The Barefoot Contessa for many years (now also the name of her famous American TV show), and baked hundreds of crostatas in her years. I love the texture of this pastry and didn’t want to change a thing about it. Ina’s recipe makes enough for two delicious galettes, so you can freeze the second half for another time if you like.

Pastry: (makes 2 standard sized galettes)

(Recipe for pastry by Ina Garten)

  • 2 cups cake flour
  • ¼ cup caster sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 250 g cold butter, diced
  • 60 ml (1/4 cup) ice water

Almond paste: (enough for 2 galettes)

  • 100 g (250 ml) ground almonds
  • 250 ml icing sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon almond essence
  • 1 egg white (large egg)

Filling: (enough for 2 galettes)

  • 1 egg, lightly whisked (for brushing)
  • 6 large cling peaches, peeled and sliced (pits removed) – or use any other seasonal fruit except strawberries and bananas
  • 15-30 ml cinnamon sugar

Method:

For the pastry: Place the flour, sugar, salt and butter in a food processor. Pulse until it resembles breadcrumbs, then add the iced water all at once while the motor is running. As soon as the dough starts to come together, remove it from the bowl onto a floured surface. Press into a disk shape, then cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour.

For the almond paste: Place all the ingredients together in a food processor. Process until it comes together into a ball (add more icing sugar if your mixture is too sticky). Remove and refrigerate (for at least an hour) in an airtight plastic bowl.

To assemble: Pre-heat oven to 220 C. Roll out the pastry on a floured surface to a thickness of about 5 mm. Transfer carefully onto a large baking tray lined with baking paper. Brush the top of the pastry with egg, leaving a 3cm border around the edges. Coarsely grate the almond paste all over the brushed egg pastry surface, then cover with peach slices. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar, then bake for 25-30 minutes until golden brown. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack before serving with vanilla ice cream (serve hot or at room temperature).

 Credits:

This post was originally written for The Pretty Blog by Ilse van der Merwe from The Food Fox.

Recipe, food preparation and text: Ilse van der Merwe

Photography: Tasha Seccombe

Prop Styling: Nicola Pretorius

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Panzanella with smoked chicken, capers & basil

6 Feb

Panzanella: a traditional Tuscan bread salad (photography by Tasha Seccombe, styling by Nicola Pretorius)

These days, most of us have access to great bread. Here in my hometown of Stellenbosch I can buy a large loaf of freshly baked sour dough bread any day of the week at Schoon de Compagne, and I use it in so many ways.

On the first day, I just eat it on its own, drenched with great quality olive oil or topped with a thick slab of cold Ayrshire butter. On day 2, I eat it toasted as bruschetta with various toppings: slow roasted tomatoes with garlic, marinated peppers, baked aubergines with feta, the list is endless. On day 3, I use it to make croutons or process it to make breadcrumbs for toppings and stuffings. The uses are infinite and the bread just keeps on giving. (For more ideas, check out Saveur’s 40 favourite recipes with stale bread.)

The Italians have great ways of using stale bread. They make fantastic soups, salads, meat dishes and even puddings with it – economical and oh so tasty. One of my favourite Italian inspired ways of using a stale loaf is to make panzanella, a traditional summery Tuscan salad of bread and tomatoes. There are many versions of panzanella, but mine contains tomatoes, yellow peppers, capers, basil, red onion and smoked chicken.

And here’s a handy tip: if you want to give your panzanella an authentic Italian look, don’t cut the bread, rather break it into chunks. This way the salad has so much more character. It’s a meal on its own, but don’t be afraid to serve it as one of many dishes on a lazy, extended, weekend lunch with lots of great wine in a shady spot under the trees.

Ingredients: (serves 4 as a main meal, or 6 as a side dish)

For the “croutons”:

  •  about 3 cups of stale torn bread chunks (preferably sour dough or ciabatta)
  • 60 ml olive oil

For the dressing:

  • 60 ml (1/4 cup) extra virgin olive oil
  • 60 ml (1/4 cup) red wine vinegar
  • 1 clove garlic, minced/crushed
  • salt and black pepper for seasoning

For the salad:

  • 3 cups toasted croutons (see above)
  • 2 small smoked chicken breasts, sliced or torn into smaller chunks
  • 250 g mixed small tomatoes, sliced in half or in smaller slices
  • 1 yellow pepper, seeds and pith removed, sliced
  • 50 g capers (drained)
  • 1/4 cup of finely sliced red onion (optional)
  • a handful of fresh basil leaves

Method:

  1. For the croutons: In a large pan over medium-high heat, add the oil and then toast the bread chunks until they are golden brown on all sides. Toss often until ready, then remove from heat and set aside to cool.
  2. For the dressing: mix all ingredients together in a cup, using a fork to whisk. Set aside.
  3. For the salad: in a large mixing bowl, add the croutons, chicken breast chunks, sliced tomatoes, sliced pepper, capers, red onion and basil. Pour half the dressing over the salad, then mix well. Add more dressing according to taste – I like it when the bread absorbs a lot of the dressing, resulting in a softer tangy chew. Transfer the mixed salad to a beautiful salad bowl, and serve immediately.

Note: If your loaf of stale bread has a very hard crust on the outside, cut it off before tearing the bread into chunks.

Credits:

This post was originally written for The Pretty Blog by Ilse van der Merwe from The Food Fox.

Recipe, food preparation and text: Ilse van der Merwe

Photography: Tasha Seccombe

Styling: Nicola Pretorius

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Quinoa salad

27 Jan

A summery quinoa salad, inspired by a traditional Middle Eastern “tabbouleh” (photography by Tasha Seccombe, styling by Nicola Pretorius)

Although quinoa (pronounced “keen-wa”) has been around for ages in South America, most people in South Africa are still getting used to this seedy superfood. Being very high in protein and free of gluten, most of us can eat it with a clear conscience. Yes, it looks kind of like a mini bean sprout, but have a mouthful and you’ll agree that it tastes like a member of the grain family – filling and really appetising.

I love serving cooked quinoa in a cold salad. It is a fabulous side dish for dinner, and makes the perfect leftover lunch for the next day. Crisp summer flavours of a traditional Middle Eastern tabbouleh (bulgur wheat salad with tomatoes, cucumber, mint, parsley & lemon) are the perfect cornerstones for a great summery salad, so I substituted the bulgur wheat for quinoa and it worked like a charm.

I used tricoloured quinoa, but you can use whatever you can find.

Ingredients: (serves 6 as a side dish)

  • 2 cups (500 ml) water
  • 1/2 teaspoon (2,5 ml) salt
  • 1 cup (250 ml) uncooked quinoa
  • 4 med-large ripe (still firm) tomatoes, seeded & diced
  • 1 small English cucumber (of 1/2 large cucumber), seeded & diced
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) finely sliced spring onions
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) finely chopped Italian parsley
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) finely chopped mint
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • juice of a small lemon
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) extra virgin olive oil
  • salt & pepper

Method:

  1. Place water and salt in a medium size pot on the stove top and bring to the boil. Add quinoa, then turn heat down to a slow simmer, cover, and cook for about 20 minutes until all the water has been absorbed. Remove from heat and leave to cool completely.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, add the chopped tomato, cucumber, spring onions, parsley, mint and garlic.  Add the lemon juice & olive oil, then season with salt and black pepper & mix well.
  3. Now add the cooled quinoa, and mix until well combined. Serve immediately, or chill in the refrigerator until ready to serve.

Credits:

This post was originally written for The Pretty Blog by Ilse van der Merwe from The Food Fox.

Recipe, food preparation and text: Ilse van der Merwe

Photography: Tasha Seccombe

Styling: Nicola Pretorius

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Review: ZOKU Slush & Shake Maker

11 Jan

A blood orange mojito slushie (picture supplied by Golden Sturgeon)

I received this nifty little gadget via courier last year: the ZOKU Slush & Shake Maker. It’s a simple way to make ice cold drinks, icy slushies and perfectly frozen milkshakes in 7 minutes tops, on your countertop.

So how does it work? The Zoku Slush & Shake Maker consists of 3 parts: 1) a cup, 2) a stand and 3) a scraper spoon. You place the cup in your freezer for a few hours (just store it there for whenever you might need a slushie), then remove it from the freezer and place inside the stand. Now add your ingredients – anything from milk to juice, coffee or yoghurt, fruit pulp, crushed cookies or alcoholic drinks. Then watch as it turns to ice, scraping down the sides often to create a slushed effect. Safe and entertaining for kids, yet cool enough for adults to create mischievous party drinks.

ZOKU also published a beautiful book with loads of recipes and ideas for your slush gadget: The Art of Slush, also available from Yuppiechef for R195.00. Here is a recipe from this book for a blood orange mojito:

Ingredients: (serves 2)

  • 25 mint leaves
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) sugar
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) water
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) blood orange juice (or use regular oranges for an orange-coloured drink)
  • 30 ml fresh lime juice
  • 1 cup (250 ml) sparkling water
  • 50 ml rum (2 tots)

Method:

  1. Make a simple mint syrup: heat up 15 mint leaves with the sugar & water in a saucepan. Simmer for 3 minutes, then remove from the heat and leave to cool completely. Then remove the mint leaves.
  2. Now add the simple syrup to the rest of the mint leaves, orange juice, lime juice & sparkling water. Pour half of the mixture into the Slush Maker, then stir and scrape to create a thick slush. Add 1 tot rum, then stir and scrape again to create a thick slush. Repeat with remaining half of mixture to create 2 mojitos.

You can find the Slush & Shake Maker at Boardmans, @Home, Wellness Warehouse, ToyZone and online at Yuppiechef.co.za for around R250. Available in 5 bright colours. A great summer gift for the whole family.

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