Quick braaied lamb shawarmas

14 Jan

Braaied lamb chops make the ultimate shawarma topping.

Braaied lamb chops make the ultimate shawarma topping (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Whenever I go to the Stellenbosch Slowmarket, I order a lamb shawarma for lunch. The guys at this stall make seriously awesome shawarmas, dripping with juicy marinated meat and tahini, their pitas stuffed with cucumber and red onion.

I don’t have a fabulous upright skewered shawarma grill at home – none of us do. So this is my take on an easier and quicker version, where you can marinate your lamb and give it a quick braai over hot coals. Use lamb steaks, or just cut the bone from your favourite lamb chops. The marinade is also great for a deboned leg of lamb.

Note: If you don’t have time to marinate your meat, just generously baste it with the marinade while braaing.

For the Middle-Eastern inspired shawarma marinade:

  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • a knob of ginger, peeled & finely grated
  • 6 garlic cloves, peeled & finely grated
  • 10 ml smoked paprika (or regular paprika)
  • 5 ml ground cumin
  • 5 ml ground cinnamon
  • 5 ml ground fennel / barishap
  • 2,5 ml ground nutmeg
  • 5 ml ground sumac (optional)
  • 5 ml salt flakes
  • freshly ground black pepper

Mix it all together (use a glass jar and shake it up!). Leave your meat to marinade in the sauce, covered, in the fridge for about 3 hours or overnight. Then remove from the fridge and braai until cooked to your desired liking.

To serve: (adjust quantities according to your needs)

  • marinated braaied lamb steaks (1 per person)
  • pita bread (1-2 per person)
  • sliced cucumber
  • sliced tomato (optional)
  • chopped mint leaves
  • sliced red onion
  • toasted pine nuts
  • Greek yoghurt
  • tahini (sesame paste)
  • lemon wedges (optional)

Cut meat into thin strips and serve in warm pita breads, stuffed with cucumber, chopped mint leaves, finely sliced red onion, pine nuts and creamy Greek yoghurt. Drizzle with tahini and a squirt of lemon juice.

Credits:

Recipe, food preparation, food styling & text: Ilse van der Merwe

Photography, food styling & prop styling: Tasha Seccombe

This post has also been featured on The Pretty Blog.

Scott’s bread

11 Jan

Freshly baked ciabatta loaves, made with Scott's bread recipe (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Freshly baked ciabatta loaves, made with Scott’s bread recipe (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Scott Armstrong joined the team at The Demo Kitchen in May 2015 as an intern – part of his practical experience (food media) for his chef’s course at the Institute of Culinary Arts. He was a quiet guy from the get-go, but I immediately realized what he’s made of after I plunged him into the deep side with a four-day cooking demo marathon at the Good Food & Wine Show.

Scott was always 30 minutes early for work. He skated here with headphones in his ears. He had loads of initiative and brought new recipes to the kitchen often. He had a very small notebook where he wrote down recipes like a journal, the pages falling apart from steamy kitchen environments.

The best recipe that Scott had introduced to me last year, is this bread recipe. He made paninis for our sandwiches everyday, and they were absolutely drop-dead delicious. I love a good bread recipe, and this one may be the best I’ve come across that doesn’t use a mother starter dough or several hours of double proofing or a wood fired oven. You do, however, need a stand mixer because the dough is super runny. You’ll also need a dough scraper for cutting and handling the proofed dough, otherwise the portions are very difficult to transfer to the baking tray. Expect to clean your mixer afterwards, because the sticky dough creeps up into the motor mechanism. But I promise you, it’s all worth it.

Transferring the proofed dough from the bowl to a floured surface. As you can see, it is very runny. (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Transferring the proofed dough from the bowl to a floured surface. As you can see, it is very runny. (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Thank you Scott for sharing this recipe with me. I’ll treasure it while I watch you excel at your promising career as a darn good chef.

Ingredients:

  • 1 kg white bread flour (plus more for dusting)
  • 15 ml dried yeast
  • 15 ml salt
  • 1 liter lukewarm water

Method:

  1. Place the flour, yeast and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (K-beater, not dough hook). Mix on low-speed.
  2. With the mixer running, add the water all at once. Mix for a couple of seconds on low-speed, then turn up the speed to maximum and mix for 8 minutes continuously.
  3. Scrape down the runny dough from the beater using a spatula, then cover the bowl with plastic wrap and leave to proof in a warm place until doubled in size (it reaches the top of the my KitchenAid’s bowl) – about 45 minutes.
  4. In the meantime, pre-heat your oven to 230 C. Line a large baking tray with non-stick baking paper (or use a sieve and dust with flour). Also, dust a large clean working surface with flour.
  5. Remove the plastic wrap and use a spatula to turn out the bubbly dough onto the floured surface – do not punch down the dough. Sieve more flour over the top of the dough, then use a dough scraper to cut squares or rectangles out of the dough. Transfer each one as soon as it is cut, using the dough scraper, to the baking tray. The dough will feel light as air at this point, almost like marshmallows, but is very runny and should be handled with lots of dusted flour and a light touch. Leave a little space between the dough portions, as it will rise more in the oven.
  6. Bake at 230 C for 10-15 minutes until golden brown, depending on the size of your paninis. Remove from oven and place on a cooling rack.
  7. Serve as sandwiches filled with your choice of filling, or slice up and use as a dipping bread for antipasti platters.

Tip: Keep left-over bread wrapped in plastic bags, and give it a quick refresh in the oven before serving to return it to its full glory.

Credits:

Recipe adaptation, food preparation, food styling & text: Ilse van der Merwe

Photography, food styling & prop styling: Tasha Seccombe

This post has also been featured on The Pretty Blog.

Jerusalem hummus

7 Jan

Creamy hummus with olive oil, pine nuts, parsley & crushed olives (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Creamy hummus with olive oil, pine nuts, parsley & crushed olives (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

I’ve made many, many batches of hummus in my life. I’ve searched for the best authentic recipes, but I’ve also devised shortcuts for quick fixes.

This recipe is adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi’s book “Jerusalem” as featured on the New York Times. It is one of the best recipes for hummus that I’ve ever come across, and the way he serves it (with crushed olives, toasted pine nuts, chopped parsley and olive oil) is absolutely exquisite. When you have a bowl of hummus like this in front of you with fresh bread, it becomes a full meal, a celebration of “the simple feast”.

I don’t add as much tahini (Yotam uses 1 cup of tahini for a batch of 250g dried chickpeas), but I firmly believe that adding water and lots of lemon juice to get the right texture works a lot better than adding olive oil.  Also, I process the hummus for at least 5 minutes in my processor to create a super creamy result – you shouldn’t have any gritty pieces left at all. Scrape down the sides a couple of times and continue to process. Check for a change in colour from medium sand-beige to light straw.

Note: The chickpeas need to soak overnight, so remember to start preparing a day in advance.

Ingredients: (makes about 3 cups)

  • 250 g (1 ¼ cups) dried chickpeas
  • 5 ml baking soda
  • 750 ml (3 cups) water, for soaking
  • 1,5 liters (6 cups) water, for cooking
  • 5 ml baking soda
  • 60 ml (1/4 cup) tahini paste
  • 80 ml (1/3 cup) freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 3-4 cloves garlic
  • salt to taste
  • 100 ml ice-cold water
  • olive oil, toasted pine nuts, parsley & olives, for serving

Method:

  1. Put chickpeas & 5 ml baking soda in a large bowl and cover with cold water. Leave to soak overnight (or for at least 6 hours).
  2. The next day, drain chickpeas and place in a medium pot with 1,5 liters of fresh cold water and 5 ml baking soda over high heat. Bring to a simmer, skimming off any foam & skins that float to the surface and cook for about 45 min or until they are very soft but not falling apart.
  3. Drain chickpeas and allow to cool for 15 minutes, then place in a food processor and process until you get a stiff paste. Add tahini paste, lemon juice, garlic and salt. Slowly drizzle in ice water and allow it to mix for about 3-5 minutes, until you get a very smooth and creamy paste, almost as loose as soft serve ice cream. Adjust seasoning to taste.
  4. Transfer hummus to a bowl, cover and let it rest for 30 minutes before serving. Serve at room temperature, drizzled with extra virgin olive oil, toasted pine nuts, chopped parsley and crushed olives (and fresh bread to dip). Store in the fridge, covered.

Credits:

Recipe adaptation, food preparation, food styling & text: Ilse van der Merwe

Photography, food styling & prop styling: Tasha Seccombe

This post has also been featured on The Pretty Blog.

 

Avo & blueberry salad with spinach, fennel & feta

6 Jan

Avo blueberry salad

Superfood salad of avocado, blueberries, baby spinach and fennel (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Summer is reigning supreme in the Cape Winelands, with blazing hot weather that smells like wine tasting and picnics. I’m always looking for fresh salad ideas, especially when entertaining friends and family at home. This low carb salad contains a couple of superfoods and is so very satisfying to eat.

Blueberries make an excellent salad ingredient because of their dramatic colour and tartly sweet nature. They pop in your mouth and release their magic juices that work so well with the creaminess of ripe avo and the crunch of sliced fennel and fresh baby spinach. Add the salty zing of crumbled feta and you don’t need much else to make a perfect summer meal.

I made a purple salad dressing in my pestle & mortar using blueberries, olive oil & lemon juice, crushing the skins to release their colour.

Serve this as a side salad or as a fabulous light lunch on its own.

Ingredients: (serves 4 as a light meal)

  • 200 g baby spinach leaves, washed and drained
  • 2 ripe avocados, halved, skins & pips removed
  • 1 cup of blueberries (set a few aside for the dressing)
  • 1 small fennel bulb, washed and finely sliced
  • 1-2 rounds of feta, crumbled
  • some black sesame seeds, for sprinkling (optional)
  • for the dressing:
    • 5-6 blueberries
    • 45 ml olive oil
    • 15 ml lemon juice
    • salt & pepper

Method:

  1. Arrange the spinach leaves on a wide, large platter (not a deep bowl), then arrange the avo, blueberries, fennel & feta on top. Sprinkle with sesame seeds.
  2. To make the dressing, place all the ingredients in a pestle & mortar and pound to a pulp, creating a pink emulsion. Season well with salt & pepper, then drizzle all over the salad.
  3. Serve at once.

Credits:

Recipe, food preparation, food styling & text: Ilse van der Merwe

Photography & prop styling: Tasha Seccombe

This post has also been featured on The Pretty Blog.

Granola with almonds & cranberries

4 Jan

Freshly toasted granola with cranberries (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Freshly toasted granola with cranberries (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

With summer reigning supreme in South Africa, I am welcoming every chance for an early morning run before the heat sets into full swing. After runs like these, all I want to eat is something fresh, balanced, crunchy and sustainable (in terms of energy). The most popular breakfast in our house is a bowl of home-made granola with milk or thick Greek yoghurt, served with sliced fresh fruit on top. Although I’ve never been scared of butter, this granola recipe is made without the addition of any butter or oil and is a lot lower in fat than most mueslis and granolas. Perfect for getting back in shape after a the crazy festive season.

The granola can be kept in a tightly covered glass/plastic container, and will last well for several weeks.

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups oats
  • 2 cups raw unsalted almonds (or nuts of your choice)
  • 1/2 cup sesame seeds
  • 1/2 cup linseeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2/3 cup honey or maple syrup (or a mixture of both), warmed
  • 1 cup dried cranberries

Method:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 180 C.
  2. Mix all of the ingredients together (except the cranberries), then spread out on a large baking tray lined with baking paper.
  3. Bake for 10 minutes at a time, stirring the mixture before returning to the oven. It will take about 30-40 minutes for the mixture to become caramelized and toasty – don’t let it go too dark.
  4. Remove, sprinkle the cranberries over and let it cool, stirring every now and then to prevent large clusters forming. When cool, transfer to a large container with a tight-fitting lid. Enjoy with milk or yoghurt for breakfast.

Credits:

Recipe, food preparation, food styling & text: Ilse van der Merwe

Photography & prop styling: Tasha Seccombe

This post has also been featured on The Pretty Blog.

Bistro 13’s Summer Menu Preview

30 Nov

A few weeks ago I had the privilege of attending the first birthday celebration of Bistro 13 just outside Stellenbosch, owned by chef Nick van Wyk and cricketer Faf du Plessis. Nick and multitasking PR/marketing/front-of-house powerhouse Roxy Laker received us in style with bubbly and gave us a preview of their upcoming summer menu.

Nic was recently seen on tv as judge and mentor in Kyknet’s Kokkedoor, a popular Afrikaans reality cooking show. His love of robus flavours from France and North Africa is combined with a love of nostalgic South African favourites.

Here’s Bistro 13’s summer menu preview in pictures, as I ate my way through it:

Roxy Laker & Nic van Wyk – the dynamic team from Bistro 13.

The Bistro 13 summer menu preview with wine pairings.

Crumbed goats cheese, summer salsa, olive oil and honey vinaigrette

Bistro 13 Bread board, before we start. How I love a good bread board!

Smoked paprika dusted calamari, vinaigrette baby potatoes, avocade, pickled cucumber, rouille. The pickled cucumber was one of the favourites for the day.

Monkfish, green herb crust, tomato sauce (black and red), crispy potatoes.

Crispy sweetbreads, carrot puree, brown caper butter. This is one of their signature dishes and you are going to LOVE it.

Braised lamb shoulder and rib, asparagus barley, thyme & garlic sauce, broad beans.

Three chocolate terrine with caramel sauce and praline. This is a 5 star stunning dessert and I’ll totally be back for more.

If you love discovering the best of local Stellenbosch cuisine in an unpretentious, bold, yet relaxing package, you will fall in love with Bistro 13 and the team that keeps this place buzzing. I look forward to spending many more lunch and dinner hours here.

Bistro 13 has new opening hours:

Breakfast: Sat & Sun 08h00-10h15

Lunch: Mon-Sun 12h00-15h00

Dinner: Mon-Sun 18h30-21h30

Starters range from R70-75, main courses from R120-R160 (sides charged extra) and desserts from R50-85. Tasting menu options also available, and they are kid-friendly with a lush lawn outside.

Contact them on reservations@bistro13.co.za or 021-8813044.

PEPPADEW® Pasta Sauce Recipe: BBQ marinade for meat

27 Oct

My versatile BBQ meat marinade, suitable for steak, chops, sosaties and much more (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

My versatile BBQ meat marinade, suitable for steak, chops, sosaties and much more (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

I recently had the pleasure of creating two new recipes for Peppadew®, using their convenient pasta sauce range. This is my second recipe: a versatile and fragrant BBQ meat marinade.

There are few things as satisfying as making your own delicious BBQ sauce. This chunky sauce works on almost any meat, from beef steak to lamb chops/sosaties, pork ribs and even chicken. If you prefer a smooth sauce, give it a whizz with your stick blender. Be adventurous and play around with adding more of your own spice combinations, like chinese 5-spice, cumin, coriander or all-spice.

Prep time: about 20 minutes (makes about 3 cups)

Ingredients:

  • 1 jar Peppadew® Piquanté Pepper & Garlic Pasta Sauce
  • 1 jar Peppadew® Tomato & Jalapeno Chilli Pasta Sauce
  • 1/2 cup soft brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup Worcester sauce
  • 5-10 ml Tabasco sauce (adjust according to taste)
  • 45 ml balsamic vinegar
  • 30 ml fresh lemon juice
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled & finely grated
  • a knob of ginger, peeled & finely grated

Method
In a medium size pot, mix all of the ingredients for the marinade together. Place on high heat on the stove top, then bring to a boil, stirring often.
Reduce heat to a simmer, then cook for 10 minutes without a lid. Remove from the heat.
Use warm or at room temperature, coating your meat generously before cooking over a hot fire.

Tips:

  • This marinade will last in the fridge for at least 1 week in a plastic container or glass jar, covered with a tight lid. It also makes a great dipping sauce for fried potato chips.
  • Don’t be alarmed if the sauce turns quite dark when you braai your meat – the sugar content will make it caramelize and the smoky flavours are delicious. Just watch it closely so that it doesn’t burn.

Sweet & sour pork

22 Oct

Deep fried pork in a batter, with sweet & sour sauce (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Deep fried pork in a batter, with sweet & sour sauce (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

In 2003 I started working in Belville with my friend Albert du Plessis, from his home. We started a partnership music booking agency for local rock ‘n roll artists. It was a very exciting time in my life and I enjoyed being part of this small and vibrant growing industry. During that time I also discovered a few take-away spots in the Northern Suburbs, one of which is Ho-Ho Take-Aways in Kenridge. It was run by a soft-spoken tiny Chinese woman, and she was a legend in the way that she stuffed your foamalite take-away container full of freshly cooked food. My favourite was always her sweet & sour pork – warm, crispy, golden nuggets with a small container of sweet and sour dipping sauce. I would stand in her shop, mesmerized, looking at the way she filled the containers with her scoop. More, more, always more. It was a value-for-money bonanza, and the best sweet & sour pork that I’ve ever tasted. She’s still there as far as I know, but sadly I don’t frequent that neck of the woods that often anymore.

This is the closest I could come to Ho-Ho’s legendary sweet & sour pork. Be sure to eat it straight from the fryer, as it becomes a bit softer on standing. If you’re feeling lazy, buy some sweet & sour sauce from your local speciality store instead of making your own.

Ingredients for the sauce:

  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) sugar
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) white vinegar
  • 10-15 ml soy sauce
  • 45 ml tomato sauce (I prefer All Gold)
  • 20 ml corn flour, mixed with 125 ml cold water

Mix the sugar, vinegar, soy and tomato sauce in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Stir in the cornflour/water mixture, then turn down to a simmer and stir until thickened – it will happen quite quickly. Remove from the heat and set aside. Serve warm or cold as a dipping sauce.

Ingredients for the pork: (serves 2)

  • 2 XL eggs
  • 60 ml cake flour
  • 60 ml corn flour
  • a pinch of salt
  • canola oil for deep-frying
  • 250 g lean pork meat (like fillet or steak), trimmed and cubed (about 2 x 2 cm)
  1. Mix the eggs, cake flour, corn flour and salt together to a sticky batter.
  2. Heat the oil over medium high heat until it reaches around 180 C.
  3. Dip the cubes of pork into the batter and carefully drop into the hot oil, frying until golden on all sides. Drain on kitchen paper. Serve immediately with sweet & sour sauce.
Deep fried pork in a batter, with sweet & sour sauce (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Deep fried pork in a batter, with sweet & sour sauce (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Credits:

Recipe, food preparation & text: Ilse van der Merwe

Photography: Tasha Seccombe

Assistant: Scott Armstrong

PEPPADEW® Pasta Sauce Recipe: Chicken tikka masala marinade

7 Oct

Peppadew® chicken tikka masala marinade for super tender chicken sosaties (picture by Tasha Seccombe)

Peppadew® chicken tikka masala marinade for super tender chicken sosaties (picture by Tasha Seccombe)

I recently had the pleasure of creating a few new recipes for Peppadew®, using their convenient pasta sauce range. This first recipe is an easy tikka masala marinade for chicken, so fantastic for entertaining a crowd over the festive season – you just mix up all the ingredients and your marinade is ready to use.

Marinating boneless chicken in yoghurt and lemon juice is the secret to extra juicy, tender and delicious sosaties. This recipe contains all the right spices for a fragrant mild tikka sauce. Add extra chilli if you love things more spicy!

Prep time: marinating – minimum 3 hours, cooking – 10 minutes.

Serves: 6

You’ll need:

  • 1 jar Peppadew® Green Pepper & Garlic Pasta Sauce
  • 500 ml double cream unflavoured yoghurt
  • 60 ml fresh lemon juice
  • 30 ml vegetable oil
  • a knob of fresh ginger, peeled & finely grated
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled & finely grated
  • 5 ml ground coriander
  • 2,5 ml ground cumin
  • 5 ml ground turmeric
  • 30 ml garam masala
  • 10 ml salt
  • 5 ml freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 large boneless chicken breasts, cut into large cubes
  • 6 large or 12 medium sosatie sticks/skewers
  • a handful of fresh coriander, for garnish

Method:
In a large glass/ceramic/plastic bowl, mix all of the ingredients for the marinade together (except the chicken, sosatie sticks and fresh coriander).
Add the chicken cubes to the sauce and mix well to cover all over. Cover the bowl with a tight fitting lid or plastic wrap and leave to marinate in the fridge for at least 3 hours or overnight.
Bring the meat to room temperature by leaving it on the kitchen counter for an hour. Place the marinated cubes on your sosatie sticks, taking care not to overcrowd the sticks.
Braai the sosaties on a hot fire/grill, turning frequently to prevent burning. Braai until just done (do not overcook), then scatter with fresh coriander and serve hot.

Tips:
This marinade will also work very well for bone-in chicken pieces. Make small slits in the chicken pieces through the skin, so that the marinade can penetrate the meat. Braai the marinated chicken pieces over a medium hot fire for at least 40 minutes, turning frequently until cooked through and golden brown on both sides.

The versatile Peppadew® pasta sauce range.

The versatile Peppadew® pasta sauce range.

“Lekkerbek” bobotie

18 Sep

Fragrant spiced beef mince baked with raisins, bay leaves and a savoury custard topping (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Fragrant spiced beef mince baked with raisins, bay leaves and a savoury custard topping (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Bobotie is one of those South African dishes that most of us know and love. But I’ve had some pretty bland boboties in my life, ranging from under seasoned to just plain boring. I love a bobotie with lots of fruity flavours, fragrant spices, zesty with lemon juice, moist with all the right oils and sugars.
I found this recipe many years ago in the Huisgenoot Top 500 Wenresepte, published in 2006. It’s a compilation of Huisgenoot magazine’s most loved recipes over a couple of years, as compiled by their legendary food editor Carmen Niehaus. Carmen’s husband was my grade 5 teacher at Stellenbosch Primary school – blast from the past. She is one of my food icons in South Africa and I recently had the privilege of hosting her for lunch as part of a product showcase at The Demo Kitchen in Stellenbosch.
This recipe for traditional South African bobotie is the best I’ve come across. The list of ingredients seem endless, but each one on this list is essential and creates the most delicious and flavoursome bobotie, everytime. Don’t be alarmed by the large quantity of milk in the custard topping – it really works.
Serve with your choice of sambals (sliced banana, desiccated coconut, chopped tomatoes with red onion), chutney and yellow rice.

Ingredients: (serves 8)
TIP: Before your start, measure out the dry spices together in a small bowl, and the wet ingredients together in another small bowl.

  • 30 ml vegetable oil
  • 3 onions, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 15 ml fresh ginger, finely grated
  • dry spices:
    • 15 ml mild curry powder
    • 5 ml ground turmeric
    • 5 ml ground coriander
    • 5 ml ground ginger
  • 2,5 ml ground cumin
  • 1 kg beef mince (lean)
  • salt & pepper
  • wet ingredients:
    • 30 ml lemon juice
    • 30 ml apricot jam
    • 60 ml fruit chutney
    • 30 ml Worcestershire sauce
    • 30 ml tomato paste
    • 2 slices white bread, soaked in water, pressed to a pulp
  • 30 ml soft brown sugar
  • 250 ml pitless raisins

For the custard:

  • 500 ml milk
  • 4 eggs
  • Salt & pepper
  • 4 bay leaves

Method:

  1. In a large pot, heat the oil and fry the onions until soft and starting to brown lightly.
  2. Add the garlic, ginger and dry spices and fry for another minute until the bottom of the pot goes dry and sticky.
  3. Add the beef bit by bit, breaking up any lumpy pieces. Fry, stirring, until it just starts to change colour from pink to light brown before adding more meat. The meat shouldn’t brown too much. Season generously with salt & pepper.
  4. Add the wet ingredients, sugar and raisins and give it a good stir. Reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook for 30 minutes, stirring often and taking care not to burn the bottom of the pot. Add a touch of water if the mixture is too dry.
  5. In the meantime, pre-heat oven to 180 C.
  6. Prepare the custard topping: mix the milk & eggs and season with salt & pepper. Set aside.
  7. When the bobotie is ready, transfer it to a large oven-proof baking dish and flatten the surface with a spatula. Press the bay leaves into the bobotie, then pour the custard mixture over the top. Carefully place in the oven and bake for 40 minutes until the custard is set. Remove from oven and let it stand for 10 minutes before serving.

Credits:

Food preparation & text: Ilse van der Merwe

Photography: Tasha Seccombe

Social Media Icons Powered by Acurax Web Design Company
Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On Facebook