Tag Archives: Winter

The winter set menu at Cavalli

11 Jun

Welcome drink offerend on arrival: Cavalli Capriole MCC (100% Chardonnay).

 

I was recently invited to experience the winter set menu with wine pairings at Cavalli Estate on the R44 between Stellenbosch and Somerset West. Cavalli is a pristine destination for dining, but also for tasting and buying wine, viewing their equestrian facilities, or taking a stroll through their contemporary art gallery and remarkable collection of rugby & sporting memorabilia.

A sample 2019 winter set menu (with vegetarian option) at Cavalli looks like this (subject to change, according to the seasonality/availability of produce):

WINTER SET MENU R350
with Cavalli wine pairing R425

AMUSE BOUCHE

FIRST COURSE
Slow- cooked local octopus, fermented black garlic
aioli, apple, squid ink crisp, radish, fynbos dressing
Cavalli ‘Pink Pony’ Grenache Noir 2015

SECOND COURSE
Barley & mushrooms, parmesan custard
Cavalli ‘Vendetta’ Viognier/Verdelho 2016

THIRD COURSE
Confit duck leg, orange, fennel marmalade,
mustard pommes mousseline, black kale
Cavalli ‘Nightmare’ Shiraz/Grenache 2015

FOURTH COURSE
Tonka bean crème caramel, palmier
Coffee/Tea

PETIT FOURS

VEGETARIAN WINTER SET MENU R300
with Cavalli wine pairing R375

AMUSE BOUCHE

FIRST COURSE
Parsnip, truffle & honey velouté, 65°c free range egg,
mushroom ragout, crispy enoki, smoked crème fraiche
Cavalli ‘Pink Pony’ Grenache Noir 2015

SECOND COURSE
Barley & mushrooms, parmesan custard
Cavalli ‘Vendetta’ Viognier/Verdelho 2016

THIRD COURSE
Pearl couscous risotto, red pepper, homemade
almond yoghurt, pickled naartjies, kale crisp
Cavalli ‘Nightmare’ Shiraz/Grenache 2015

FOURTH COURSE
Tonka bean crème caramel, palmier
Coffee/Tea

PETIT FOURS

Cavalli Restaurant takes full advantage of their remarkable setting. It’s a space bathed in natural light, with floor-to-ceiling glass doors opening out to a spacious terrace. Beyond the tables the views spill out across the farm dam, vineyards and paddocks; a scene framed by views of the distant Helderberg Mountains. 

Looking out from the restaurant terrace towards the equestrian facilities and the Helderberg mountains.

 

Head Chef Michael Deg has held the reins of the Cavalli kitchen since 2017, cementing the restaurant’s reputation for seasonal, sustainable cuisine. It is refined food without pretence, served within a world class setting.  For his winter menu this year, Chef Michael has created an enticing, affordable, 4-course food and wine pairing menu that will have you coming back for more. Considering the extras included in this menu (multiple amuse bouche, palate cleanser and petit fours) coupled with the service excellence and delicious wine pairings, this is one of the best fine dining winter deals the Winelands has to offer this winter.

Note: Althought chef Michael was on leave the day that we visited, his capable, talentede kitchen team provided all guests with a seamless dining experience.

I chose the vegetarian set menu, while my husband had the regular set menu (he opted for the international wine pairing too, an option that cost slightly more, but totally worth it – a wine lover’s adventure). Take a look at my photographs of our experience:

We sat outside on the terrace, overlooking the pristine pond.

 

Amuse bouche: crispy carrots on marinated tofu, pickled vegetables and garden greens, fresh flour tortillas, fried black beans.

 

Another amuse bouche: I didn’t make a note of what this delightful mouthful was, but if I remember correctly, it was smoked beetroot on goatscheese and a cheese biscuit.

 

More amuse bouche: Corn & cheese croquette.

 

Yet another extra treat from the kitchen, this was a type of crispy dome that covered a mushroom mousse (if I remember correctly!).

 

Last of the surprising bites coming from the kitchen: cauliflower fritter with pineapple salsa.

 

Wine pairings with our first course.

 

FIRST COURSE: Slow- cooked local octopus, fermented black garlic aioli, apple, squid ink crisp, radish, fynbos dressing. Served with Cavalli ‘Pink Pony’ Grenache Noir 2015. One of my favourite dishes of the day (not on the vegetarian menu).

 

FIRST COURSE (veg): Parsnip, truffle & honey velouté, 65°c free range egg,mushroom ragout, crispy enoki, smoked crème fraiche. Served with Cavalli ‘Pink Pony’ Grenache Noir 2015.

 

SECOND COURSE (regular & veg): Barley & mushrooms, parmesan custard. Served with Cavalli Cremello.

 

A closer look of the barley risotto (second course).

 

Palate cleanser: raspberry & pineapple sorbet, white chocolate, lemon curd.

 

THIRD COURSE: Confit duck leg, orange, fennel marmalade,mustard pommes mousseline, black kale. Served with Cavalli Warlord.

 

THIRD COURSE (veg): Bean puree, charred broccoli, homemade coconut yoghurt, toasted nuts, kale crisp. Served with Cavalli Warlord. This was one of my favourite dishes of the day. I’ll eat vegetarian forever if it tastes like this!

 

Cavalli’s Cremello white blend was one of my favourite wines of the day.

 

One of the international pairings of the day, in Schalk’s glass, from the Nappa Valley in California. Look at that colour!

 

FOURTH COURSE: Tonka bean crème caramel, palmiers.

 

After the dessert, we also enjoyed two petit fours each, served with coffee. This winter set menu is exceptional value and a must on your winter calendar. Sit back and enjoy premium Winelands hospitality at an affordable rate.

The winter menu is available from 1 May – 30 of August 2019 for lunch/dinner at R350 for the 4-course menu, R425 with Cavalli wine pairing and the 4-course vegetarian menu at R300 or R375 paired with Cavalli wine. Bookings are limited to a maximum of 15 guests. Cavalli Restaurant is open from Wednesday to Saturday for lunch and dinner, as well as Sundays for lunch only. For bookings email the reservation team on restaurant@cavalliestate.com

Cavalli Estate is situated at R44 Highway (Strand Road), Somerset West.

Tel: 021 855 3218

Email: info@cavalliestate.com

Wine tasting is offered from Wednesday to Sunday, 10am-6pm. Tasting fee of R60 for five premium wines, R40 for ‘Passions’ wines. For bookings or further information send a mail to wines@cavalliestate.com.

High Tea is offered in The Conservatory from Wednesday to Sunday, 12pm – 3pm. R220 per person, with a minimum of 10 guests. 

Stable tours are offered on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, from 11am – 12pm. 

Carriage rides (one hour) across the estate are available on request, and can carry up to four passengers. R2000 per carriage, including a bottle of Cavalli Estate wine. For bookings send a mail to stables@cavalliestate.com or call 021 855 3218.

The Cavalli Private Collection of South African Masters is frequently rotated in the portico situated within the main gallery and two memorabilia rooms allocated in close proximity showcase a remarkable collection of rugby and sporting memorabilia.

The gallery at Cavalli is open from Wednesday to Sunday from 10am to 6pm.​ For all enquiries or a catalogue of available artwork, please contact gallery@cavalliestate.com or call 021 855 3218.

 

Share this:

Welcoming the new Winter set menu from Terroir

28 May

Chef Michael Broughton of Terroir. Photography by Mark Hoberman.

 

Every Winter, Terroir Restaurant at Kleine Zalze in Stellenbosch announces the start of the colder season with a fresh new set menu. This year, diners will once again receive incredible value where they can choose from either a two-course option at R295 per person or three courses at R395 per person (including vegetarian options). This price also includes two glasses of Kleine Zalze Vineyard Selection wines served with the starter and main courses.

I recently had the pleasure of getting a taste of the new Winter set menu alongside a table of industry friends, hosted by chef Michael Broughton, Klein Zalze cellarmaster Alastair Rimmer and Lise Manley of Manley Communications. The Winter set menu at Terroir is an annual highlight for me and for many diners in and around Stellenbosch, and this year’s menu is a must-do on the Winter calendar. Take a tour through my photographs of my lunch experience, and be sure not to miss the show-stopping pistachio soufflé when you visit Terroir.

I shared a table with some wonderful industry peers & friends, but also had the pleasure of sitting next to Kleine Zalze cellarmaster Alaistair Rimmer (left). The wine pairings are part of the success of this package – don’t miss out.

 

As always, Terroir bread boards are served with their own sour dough bread, flatbread, olives, paté and butter.

 

Coconut cooked beef cheek doughnut with paprika and apricot jam – served with Kleine Zalze MCC Brut and Rosé NV. Such a stunning savoury and sweet amuse bouche.

 

Fennel cured and smoked trout with horseradish and Vichyssoise – served with Kleine Zalze Barrel Fermented Chenin Blanc 2017. It was great to see a “fresher” starter choice as part of a winter menu.

 

Braised shoulder and grilled rack of Karoo lamb “au jus” with Fregola, pickled mustard seeds, peas and bagna cauda – served with Kleine Zalze Whole bunch Syrah 2017. Chef Michael does lamb very well, and his sauce skills are uncontested.

 

One of the side dishes as part of the main course – zucchini tempura. Stunning!

 

Poached pineapple, scented Catalan Crème with vanilla and saffron ice cream.

 

Pistachio soufflé with milk ice cream and vanilla caramel – served with Stellenrust Chenin d’ Muscat Noble Late Harvest 2015. My dish of the day. A must have.

 

And just because the pistachio soufflé was that good, here’s another view of it. One of the best soufflé’s I’ve had in years.

 

The winter special offer is valid from 2 May to 30 September 2019, for both lunch and dinner (max 10 pax per booking). Individual à la carte orders can still be made, and will be charged at the listed menu price.

Terroir is open for lunch from Tuesdays to Sundays from 12h00 – 14h30 and for dinner from Tuesdays to Saturdays from 18h30 – 21h00. Advance reservations are highly recommended. To book call 021 880-8167 or email restaurant@kleinezalze.co.za

Please note that Terroir will be closed for their annual winter break from 17th June 2019 and re-opening on the 10th of July 2019.

Kleine Zalze Wines and Terroir restaurant are situated on Strand Road (R44), Stellenbosch, South Africa.

Share this:

A welcoming winter offering at Terroir, Stellenbosch

22 Jun

The entrance to Terroir Restaurant, reflecting the luminous green vegetation on their stoep after the winter rains. The doors are only closed on account of the weather – inside it is cosy and warm.

 

Acclaimed restaurant Terroir has recently welcomed the arrival of winter in the winelands with a special menu offering from Chef Michael Broughton, encouraging guests to indulge in the true Terroir experience with a taste of the full à la carte menu at an extremely pocket-friendly price. From May to September 2018 guests can enjoy their choice of two dishes (starter/main or main/dessert) from Terroir’s French-inspired chalkboard menu for just R395 per person. This price also includes a glass of Kleine Zalze Vineyard Selection wine.

Due to the success of 2017’s multi-course winter tasting menu, Chef Michael Broughton has come up with an additional offer of a chef’s choice of four courses at R550 p/p including a glass of Kleine Zalze’s award-winning wines. After receiving an invitation to experience the winter menu, I visited Terroir yesterday – what a pleasure! There is a reason why Terroir remains a favourite amongs locals (and international visitors alike). They consistently serve guests with carefully designed seasonal dishes, expertly crafted flavours and true winelands hospitality within a premium yet unpretentious environment. There’s certainly something to be said for keeping up your game for 14 years consistently – it’s not easy and the playing field in Stellenbosch is especially tough. Well done Chef Michael Broughton and team, you’ve once again shown why we continue to recommend you to visitors from all over in our beautiful town. You’re simply brilliant.

The winter special offer is valid from 2 May to 30 September, for lunch and dinner. Individual à la carte orders can still be made and will be charged at the listed menu price.

Terroir is open for lunch from Tuesdays to Sundays (12h00 – 14h30) and for dinner from Tuesdays to Saturdays (18h30 – 21h00). Advance reservations are highly recommended: 021 880-8167 or email restaurant@kleinezalze.co.za .

Please note that Terroir will be closed for their annual winter break from 25 June 2018 and re-opening on 17 July 2018.

Take a look at our winter lunch experience below, featuring the chef’s four course tasting menu:

An interior view of Terroir Restaurant: clean, cosy, contemporary, unpretentious, welcoming.

The wine list at Terroir.

The iconic hand written chalk board menu at Terroir. This menu changes according to the seasons and availability of ingredients.

This photograph was taken through the glass window on a chilly yet semi-clear winter’s day – the view from our table, indoors.

What better way to start a Thursday winter lunch than with Kleine Zalze bubbles? Aaaah.

Friendly, professional serving staff at Terroir.

Bread board at Terroir with home baked sour dough and tomato bread, with olives, kimchi butter and aubergine puree. You will LOVE the butter and puree – exquisite!

Kleine Zalza Vineyard Selection wooded chenin blanc with our starters. One of my favourites wines from Kleine Zalze. So versatile.

Comté onion soup with poached hen’s egg & onion brioche. This was one of my favourite dishes of the day – so simple, yet so difficult to take to the next level. Silky onion, runny egg yolk, crispy brioche – prefection.

Malay-style baby squid, smoked mackarel aioli and coconut. Who would have thought that “curried fish” goes so well with pineapple salsa? A fantastic combo, both flavour-wise and texture-wise.

One of the most popular dishes on Terroir’s menu: prawn risotto, sauce Americain. This is a very creamy risotto with surprising pockets of crunchy fresh corn inbetween, pan-fried prawns with chilli and citrus, and a smoky oil. The sauce is rich and almost like an aioli/bisque. Don’t miss it.

Lamb, Parisian gnocchi, kimchi, aioli, jus. Smoky, charred flavours, great contrasting textures.

Duck with roasted kohlrabi, kromeski, rhubarb jus, carrot crumble. This dish also featured a ketchup-style BBQ sauce. Bold and inventive.

Ribeye of beef, butternut terrine, crispy kale, beef cheeks in potato, burnt butter crumble, hollandaise foam. Big on umami, perfect winter fare.

Noble late harvest from Ken Forrester to match my dessert.

It’s been a while since I’ve seen such a beautiful dessert: Viennese sachertorte, caramelized rice crispies, kirsch ice cream. Such a stunning way to end this winter menu!

Trio of ice cream for my daughter: dulce de leche, lemon curd and cookies & cream. Exquisite.

Vanilla bean tart, almond crumble, vanilla ice cream. Delicate perfection.

Take a trip to the tasting room next door to purchase some wines for the weekend.

Terroir from the outside facing the golf course. You rarely see this view. We sat in the centre, just next to the glass doors.

The grass is luminous green in Stellenbosch because of the recent rains. This is the stunning lawn in front of Terroir Restaurant.

 

Incredible to have a proper rainy winter for the first time in a few years in Stellenbosch. Luscious green views from the front of Terroir Restaurant.

Autumn and winter collides in colour.

Terroir is situated on a working farm and wine estate. Be sure to visit their tasting room – it’s well worth it!

Share this:

A baking class with Martjie Malan

30 May

Martjie Malan with trays of gougères and craquelins, ready for the oven.

I’m such a fan of recreational baking and always keen on learning more and sharpening my skills. Yesterday I attended Martjie Malan‘s first baking class in her winter series of 2018, with a focus on choux pastry. Here are some of the pictures I took (in the short moments when my hands weren’t full of custard or chocolate!). Martjie is a talented baker who’s come a long way since being runner up in Koekedoor, kykNet’s super popular reality baking series/competition. A few years back, while she still had a bakery and restaurant in Stellenbosch called M Patisserie, I was a massive fan of her French pastries, especially her almond croissants and her petit fours. That being said, I jumped to take up the opportunity to learn from a master like Martjie.

Keen an eye on Martjie’s Facebook page for more upcoming classes, all held at The Styling Shed outside Stellenbosch on the Devon Valley Road. If you’re an avid baker, keen to learn more, book your spot for one of Martjie’s upcoming classes.

 

Tea, coffee and pastries on arrival.

A leafy corner of the venue, The Styling Shed.

Martjie welcomes us.

Crème de pâtissièr, or pastry custard, as demonstrated by Martjie.

Making perfect choux pastry.

How to pipe like a pro.

Scooping choux dough into pastry bags.

And now for the longer shaped choux pastries, or eclairs.

Freshly baked profiteroles, straight from the oven.

Assembling the craquelins.

Freshly baked gougères. They disappeared in a second – so delicious!

Everyone got a chance to fill the freshly baked pastries.

Elmarie taking a picture of the beautiful chocolate ganache.

My finished product: fresh chocolate profiteroles filled with chocolate custard and glazed with chocolate ganache.

Share this:

A stay with dinner and breakfast at Majeka House

28 May

The pathway from our room door towards the entrance and reception area of Majeka House.

 

Earlier this year, I received an invitation to visit Majeka House Hotel & Restaurant in Stellenbosch for a stayover for two including a four course dinner with wine pairing. Majeka House is a boutique gem in the heart of residential Paradyskloof, discreetly tucked away between the quiet neighbourhood houses adjacent to Vriesenhof Wine Estate. Their restaurant, Makaron, has won numerous awards and is considered a must-visit on the Stellenbosch food landscape.

A bird’s eye view of Majeka House Hotel & Spa. Picture supplied by Majeka House.

 

Here are the highlights of our stay, our dinner and our breakfast in pictures. For me, Majeka House is a premium, boldly stylish, intimately private retreat where you will feel pampered and refreshed. The rooms are lavishly decorated with wall art, bold colours, eclectic furniture and beautiful tropical glass panels. There’s no room for “boring” here, and you’ll know for sure that you’re not in just another hotel suite.

Makaron’s small plate menu is driven by Chef Lucas Carstens – a man of few words that prefer to speak the language of good food. His courses were thoughtful, delicate, sometimes provoking and an all-round pleasure, especially with the spot-on wine pairing that really opens up the experience to another level. The amouse bouche and bread board (compliments from the kitchen) were some of my favourite items of the evening. The wine pairing is highly recommended and adds a lot to the dining experience at Makaron, presenting the inhouse sommelier’s clever and sometimes surprising wine choices from hand picked estates and boutique wineries. You’ll probably also discover a wine (or two) that you’ve never heard of before and that might just become your new favourite. All staff members at Makaron were friendly, professional and highly informed.

Breakfast has always been a highlight for me at Majeka House, especially with MCC on ice, trays full of freshly baked canelés (and other baked goods), individually potted treats and jugs full of freshly juiced fruit and veggies that will make you feel like a champion. I’m not one for hot breakfasts (my husband loves a good scramble or eggs Benedict, and that is also available, of course), but you can catch me in a trap with proper French pastries. Theirs are simply fantastic.

Majeka House has a few fabulous specials running during Autumn and Winter, check it out:

Away in May: R1990 pp sharing

  • Choice of a 60 min treatment each and a 4-course small plate dinner (excl. beverages) at Makaron for 2
  • 1 night accommodation for 2 in a Premier room
  • Breakfast for 2
  • Upgrade to a Garden for R600, Mountain View for R920 and Poolside for R1510; Single supplement of R520

Winter Night Out: R1325 pp sharing

  • 1 night accommodation in a Premier room
  • 4-course small plate dinner at Makaron for 2 (excl. beverages)
  • Breakfast for 2
  • Upgrade to a Garden for R600, Mountain View for R920 and Poolside for R1510; Single supplement of R520
  • Valid from 1 May to 30 September except for Wednesdays

Winter Escape: R1845 pp sharing

  • 1 night accommodation in a Premier room
  • Choice of a 60 min treatment each and a 4-course small plate dinner (excl. beverages) at Makaron for 2
  • Breakfast for 2
  • Upgrade to a Garden for R600, Mountain View for R920 and Poolside for R1510; Single supplement of R520
  • Valid from 1 June to 30 September except for Wednesdays

Book now:  +27 21 880 1549 | reservations@majekahouse.co.za

Relaxing in our room in the Autumn sun, just after arrival.

 

Our plush king size bed with mesmerising wall paper art.

 

Our room opened up onto a semi-private pool and veranda (shared with the suite next door). This is the view from the veranda towards our back door.

 

 

The striking striped pool outside our room.

 

Blue pool chairs and shades of Autumn.

 

Time for an afternoon gin, of course.

 

Dinner starts: Compliments from the kitchen: caesar taco / crispy chicken skin & truffle / beetroot & trout cracker.

 

“Roosterkoek” & bokkom butter, mosbolletjie & korrelkonfyt.

 

Langoustine mi cuit, sea butter, fermented cucumber, green curry juice.

 

Zucchini risotto, raw mushrooms, cured egg yolk shavings. This dish has been on the menu since Chef Lucas started his journey at Makaron, and it has remained a favourite ever since. It was my favourite dish of the day – the cured egg yolk is such a stunner!

 

House smoked hake, celeriac, dill, whey soured onions.

 

Mushroom ravioli, house made malt vinegar, parmesan. PS: The “ravioli” wasn’t your regular pasta, it was a clear sheet of mushroom flavoured stock or something, that held a chunky mushroom filling that you could see from the outside. Mesmerising.

 

Pineapple, white chocolate, coconut, fennel.

 

I cannot remember this chocolate creation’s menu name, but I think the ice cream on top was malt-infused. It was the perfect end to an exquisite evening.

 

These dainty little toffee apples are the size of large cherries and they are incredibly delicious! Not your standard candy apples, for sure.

 

Early morning peak at the mountain on our way to breakfast.

 

My happy place: the breakfast table at Majeka House.

 

Many difference potted treats, including homemade yoghurts, compotes, granola, smoked fish and lots more.

 

One of my highlights: a freshly baked tray of canelés.

 

The breakfast table from the other end, also showing one of the many characteristic ornamental pigs at Majeka House.

Share this:

Italian-style white bean soup with lamb knuckle

14 May

One of my favourite recipes this winter: a brothy white bean soup made with lamb knuckle and topped with salsa verde. Photography by Tasha Seccombe.

 

Although many of us know and love traditional South African bean soup made with red speckled beans, there’s another variety that you absolutely have to try. It is made with small white haricot beans (almost like Italian canellini beans, which are not very common in SA in its dried form). These beans are very smooth in texture and they tend to not fall apart as easily as their speckled cousins, resulting in a non-stodgy end result. This is a slightly thickened brothy soup with chunks of deliciously tender meat and beautiful, small, silky beans. Made with chicken stock instead of mutton or beef stock, the soup is also lighter in colour than most bean soups. A dollop of punchy green salsa verde adds just the right lift to this meal.

A single lamb knuckle, sliced by your butcher, is enough to add the meatiness that this soup needs. It’s an economical way to serve a stylish soup in a fresh way this Winter. Serve with crusty bread, if you like.

Ingredients: (serves 6)

  • 30 ml olive oil
  • about 600 g lamb knuckle, sliced horizontally by your butcher
  • 1 large onion, peeled & finely chopped
  • 1-2 sticks celery, finely chopped
  • 1 large (or 2 medium) carrots, peeled & finely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled & finely chopped
  • 3 sprigs rosemary
  • 250 ml dry white wine
  • 2 liters chicken stock
  • 500 g small white beans (haricot)
  • salt & pepper, to taste
  • for the salsa verde:
    • a handful each parsley, basil & mint
    • 1 garlic clove
    • 2 teaspoons capers
    • 15-30 ml lemon juice
    • 45-60 ml olive oil
    • a pinch of salt
    • 10 ml Dijon mustard

Method:

  1. Heat the oil on high heat in a large wide pot (at least 6 liters capacity), then fry lamb knuckle in batches until browned on both sides (cut larger chunks of meat in half). Remove the meat from the pot and set aside, then turn down heat to  medium.
  2. Fry the onion, celery & carrot until soft, stirring often (add a little more oil if needed). Add the garlic & rosemary (add the sprigs whole, you’ll remove the woody stems later) and fry for another minute.
  3. The bottom of the pot should be coated with sticky brown bits by now. Add the white wine and stir to deglaze. Add the fried meat with all the juices back into the pot, then top with stock. Add the beans and stir. Note: Don’t add any salt until tright at he end, otherwise the beans won’t become tender.
  4. Bring to a simmer, stirring now and then, then turn heat down to low, cover with a lid and cook for about 2,5-3 hours until the meat is falling from the bone and the beans are really tender.
  5. Season generously with salt & pepper and remove from the heat to rest for about 15 minutes before serving.
  6. To make the salsa verde, chop all the ingredients together by hand or in a food processor. Taste and adjust with more salt or lemon juice if needed.
  7. Serve the soup in bowls with a dollop of salsa verde (and some crusty bread for dipping, optionally).

This recipe was created in collaboration with Lamb & Mutton South Africa. #CookingWithLamb #LambAndMuttonSA #WholesomeAndNutritious #CleanEating #TheWayNatureIntended

Share this:

Spicy lamb & chickpea stew

14 May

Naturally gluten-free, this fragrant and spicy lamb stew is easy to make, hearty, and perfect for Autumn & Winter. Photography by Tasha Seccombe.

 

This easy North African-style lamb & chickpea stew is heartier than a soup, yet it doesn’t need to be served with any added starch. It is high in protein, relatively low in fat and naturally gluten-free.

I love the fact that it can be made with a few pantry staples like canned tomatoes and chickpeas, stretching a relatively small amount of meat to serve a crowd. Top it generously with fresh herbs like coriander, mint or parsley and a squeeze of lemon juice. Perfect Autumn fare!

Ingredients: (serves 4-6)

  • 30 ml olive oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • about 800 g boneless lamb/mutton, cubed 2x2cm (leg works well, but any boneless meat will work)
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 5 ml (1 teaspoon) ground cumin
  • 15 ml (1 tablespoon) smoked paprika
  • 2,5 ml (1/2 teaspoon) harissa dried spice blend (or cayenne pepper)
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 5 ml (1 teaspoon) sugar
  • 500 ml lamb/mutton stock
  • 1 can chopped tomatoes
  • 2 cans chickpeas, drained
  • finely grated zest (and 15 ml juice, reserved) of a fresh lemon
  • salt & pepper, to taste
  • a generous handful fresh coriander/mint/parsley, to serve

Method:

  1. In a large heavy based pot with lid, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion and fry until translucent and soft. Turn up the heat and add the meat cubes, browning on all sides but not cooking through.
  2. Add the garlic, cumin, paprika, harissa, cinnamon stick and stir for 1 minute.
  3. Add the sugar, stock, tomatoes, chickpeas and lemon zest and bring to a simmer. Turn down heat to very low, then simmer for about 2 hours or until the meat is very tender, stirring now and then to check that the bottom is not burning.
  4. Season generously with salt & pepper, add the lemon juice and stir in half of the fresh herbs. Remove from the heat. Serve in bowls with more fresh herbs.

Note: This stew can be made a day or two ahead and reheated – it also freezes well. Leg meat should take less time to get tender, but any cut will eventually get really soft.

This recipe was created in collaboration with Lamb & Mutton South Africa. #CookingWithLamb #LambAndMuttonSA #WholesomeAndNutritious #CleanEating #TheWayNatureIntended

Share this:

Easy lamb chop bourguignon (French-style stew in red wine)

20 Apr

This hearty lamb chop stew in red wine is based on the classic French beef bourguignon, perfect for colder evenings. Photography by Tasha Seccombe.

 

Beef bourguignon is probably one of the best-known classic French dishes, also famously featured in the movie Julie & Julia. This fuss-free version is made with delicious lamb chops – a hearty, upgraded “plan B” for when the weather is not ideal for a braai. Yes, there’s more than one way to enjoy a chop. Bring on winter, please!

This recipe is also perfect for making in a cast iron potjie over the fire, if you prefer. Check out my easy how-to video:

 

Ingredients: (serves 6)

45 ml olive oil
1,2 kg lamb chops
salt & pepper
250 g streaky bacon, chopped
2 large onions, peeled & quartered
4 cloves garlic, peeled & sliced
5 sprigs thyme, woody stalks removed
30 ml tomato paste
10 ml cake flour
750 ml dry red wine (a Bordeaux-style blend works well)
250 g small mushrooms (or halved if bigger)
500 g tagliatelle, cooked & buttered, for serving
a handful fresh parsley, chopped, for serving

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 170 C.
  2. Heat the oil in a heavy based large pot (that has a lid) over high heat. Fry the chops in batched, browning them on both sides and seasoning with salt & pepper. Remove from the pot and turn down the heat to low.
  3. Add the bacon, onions, garlic & thyme and fry for 2-3 minutes, stirring.
  4. Add the tomato paste & flour, stirring.
  5. Add the red wine and stir to loosen any sticky bits on the bottom of the pot. Now add the browned meat and juices back to the pot and bring to a simmer. Cover with a lid and braise in the oven for about 2,5-3 hours or until the meat is just starting to fall from the bone. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary.
  6. Add the mushrooms and cook for a further 10-15 minutes (covered), then remove from the oven.
    Serve hot with freshly cooked tagliatelle (or rice or potatoes) and scattered parsley.

Note: This tagine can be made a day ahead and reheated before serving as the flavours improve on standing (store in the refigerator overnight). Freezes very well.

This is the third recipe in a series of four Mediterranean-inspired Autumn/Winter dishes for Lamb & Mutton SA. Also check out my recipes for Greek-style 8-hour leg of lamb with origanum & preserved lemon and Italian-style lamb & tomato ragu with gnocchi.

Share this:

Lamb & tomato ragu with gnocchi

5 Apr

Lamb & tomato ragu with gnocchi, basil and parmesan (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

 

This is hands-down one of the most comforting dishes I’ve ever eaten. It is made with boneless lamb that’s been cubed into 1 x 1 cm blocks – don’t stress about the labour, it goes quickly and it’s actually quite therapeutic (read: pour yourself a glass of wine while you do it). You can use chops, leg or even stewing meat, just remove the bones and chop-chop-chop. The result is a chunkier ragu than those made with ground meat, very tender with an incredible mouth-feel and packed with simple, robust flavours. Just the way the Italians intended.

I love serving this ragu with gnocchi, but it also works well with pasta – homemade is best. Fresh basil and grated parmigiano is compulsory. Bellissima!

Check out this handy how-to video:

Ingredients: (serves 6)

45 ml olive oil
1 large onion, peeled & finely chopped
1-2 celery sticks, finely chopped
1 large carrot, peeled & finely chopped
2 sprigs rosemary, woody stems removed & finely chopped
1 kg boneless lamb/mutton, cubed into 1 x 1 cm pieces
1 cup (250 ml) dry white wine
2 cans whole Italian tomatoes, roughly chopped, with juice
salt & pepper
5 ml sugar
about 750g-1 kg fresh gnocchi, cooked, to serve (or 500 g dried pasta, cooked)
a handful fresh basil leaves, to serve
grated parmesan cheese, to serve

Method:

  1. In a heavy based large pot, heat the oil over medium heat and fry the onion, celery, carrot and rosemary until soft and fragrant.
  2. Add the cubed meat and turn up the heat. Fry until it starts to catch (get brown and sticky) on the bottom stirring often – this is important, so be patient. It takes about 10-15 minutes.
  3. Add the wine and stir to deglaze. Add the chopped tomatoes with juice, season with salt & pepper, add the sugar and stir. Bring to a simmer, then turn the heat down low, cover and cook for 2-3 hours until very soft. Stir every now and then.
  4. Serve with cooked gnocchi or pasta, with fresh basil and grated parmesan cheese.

Note: Store-bought gnocchi don’t pan-fry well and should rather be boiled briefly in salted water until they pop to the surface. Freshly made gnocchi can be directly pan-fried in butter until golden, it only take a few minutes over medium heat and it is most definitely my preference.

This is the second recipe in a series of four Mediterranean-inspired Autumn/Winter dishes for Lamb & Mutton SA. Also check out my recipe for Greek-style 8-hour leg of lamb with origanum & preserved lemon.

Share this:

Roasted tomato soup with pumpkin bread and garam masala marrow bones

25 Jul

A Winter evening’s delight: roasted tomato soup, roasted marrow bones with garam masala, and pumpkin bread toast. Photography by Tasha Seccombe. Tableware, linen and cutlery by HAUS.

 

There are few things that beat the smell of freshly baked bread. But have you smelled oven roasted tomatoes? Man, that is something very special. It permeates your house with a sweet and savoury umami fragrance that is second to none.

I’ve put together a menu for the ultimate wintery soup night in. Oven roasted tomato soup has been one of the favourites for many years, so I’ve decided to serve it this time with a deliciously chewy pumpkin loaf and roasted garam masala marrow bones instead of butter.

Because all three recipes need oven time, start with the soup. While it’s in the oven, make the bread dough. Then when the bread is baking, prep the garam masala. Roast the marrow bones right before serving everything.

Oh, and I’m also going to tell you how to make your own super fragrant garam masala. It will change your spice game in a huge way.

Bon appetit!

Roasted tomato soup: (serves 6)

  • about 16 large ripe tomatoes
  • 2 cans whole tomatoes
  • 200 g (about 4 large) leeks
  • 1 carrot, peeled
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • a handful thyme sprigs
  • 30 ml olive oil
  • 30 ml sugar
  • 15 ml salt
  • 15 ml red wine vinegar
  • 250 ml crean

Preheat oven to 180C. Chop the tomatoes in batches in your food processor. They don’t have to be very fine, just chopped. Add it to a large deep rectangular roasting pan or a wide deep dutch oven. Process the canned tomatoes to a pulp and add it to the pan. Pulse the leeks, carrot and cloves into pieces, then add it on top of the tomatoes. Place the thyme sprigs on top, then drizzle all over with olive oil and sprinkle with the sugar, salt and red wine vinegar. Without stirring too much (just flatten the surface) place into the oven and roast for 2 hours, stirring well every 30 minutes. The mixture should get toasty on the edges and reduce by about 25 %. When it is read, remove from the oven, then remove the stalks of the thyme. Use a ladle to transfer the mixture to a pot, then use a stick blender to blitz to a smooth pulp. Because your using the tomatoes skins and all, your soup with still be chunky – that’s the way I prefer it. Add the cream and mix well. Check the seasoning and add more sugar, salt and vinegar if needed. Cover and set aside until ready to serve. To serve, drizzle with more cream or olive oil and your choice of herbs or croutons.

For this shoot, we got our hands on the fabulous new collection of Haus tableware by Hertex. Go to your nearest showroom to see the full collection, it is absolutely gorgeous!

A round loaf of pumpkin bread – chewey and nutty. Photography by Tasha Seccombe. Linen by HAUS.

Pumpkin bread: (makes one large loaf)

  • 1 small butternut or pumpkin
  • 4 cups stone ground white bread flour
  • 10 ml salt
  • 7,5 ml instant yeast
  • 10 ml mixed spice
  • 125 ml pumpkin seeds
  • about 1/2 cup water

Peel the butternut and cut into chunks. Boil in water until tender, then process to a pulp. You’ll need about 2 cups processed pumpkin pulp for the bread. Set aside to cool slightly, but use it while still slightly warm.

Place the flour, salt, yeast, spice and seeds in a large bowl. Mix well. Add the cooked pumpkin and water and stir until it starts to come together. Use your hands to shape it into a soft pliable dough, kneading it until it is smooth (about 5-10 minutes). Add a little more water or flour if necessary. Shape into a smooth ball, then place on a lined baking tray. Cut a cross shape on the top, then cover with a plastic bag to rise until doubled in size. When ready, bake at 220 C for about 45 minutes until golden brown and cooked. Remove from the oven and let cool on a rack. Serve the slices toasted or untoasted with butter or with roasted marrow bones.

Make your own garam masala:

  • 30 ml cumin seeds
  • 30 ml coriander seeds
  • 30 ml fennel seeds
  • 3 cloves
  • 10 green cardamom pods
  • 2 black cardamom pods
  • 2 star anise
  • 15 ml black peppercorns
  • 1 cinnamon stick or cassia bark
  • 2 bay leaves

Place all the ingredients in a wide pan, then dry roast them over medium-high heat until the mixture becomes fragrant. Transfer batches to a spice grinder, then store in an airtight container.

Roasted garam masala marrow bones on toast. Platter, linen & cutlery by HAUS.

Roasted marrow bones:

  • 3 marrow bones, sliced in half horizontally (ask your butcher)
  • 15 ml garam masala (see above)
  • 15 ml olive oil
  • salt flakes

Pre-heat oven to 220 C. Place the marrow bones cut side up in a roasting tray lined with foil or baking paper. Mix the garam masala with the oil to form a paste. Rub the paste all over the bones. Roast for about 25 minutes or until fully cooked. Serve at once, with toasted bread.

Share this:
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Instagram
YouTube