Tag Archives: Poetry stores

A Christmas picnic table with Poetry Stores: Part 2

17 Dec

My Christmas picnic spread (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

With only one week to go until Christmas, everyone’s planning their spreads and feasts. A lot of us will not only have a Christmas eve dinner, but also a Christmas day lunch. I love to go traditional for a Christmas dinner with a hot roast and lots of sides, but when it is daytime I really prefer a cold Christmas spread, casual yet indulgent – something that you can even take on the road and have as a picnic in a beautiful location.

My choices for the perfect Christmas picnic table comes from The Picnic Cookbook by Annie Bell (R285 from Poetry Stores). Annie’s recipes are simple but scrumptious, and her book is a great choice for any al fresco feast. The maple roast ham is glazed with a beautifully dark mixture of black treacle, maple syrup and English mustard – easy to make ahead and simply delicious served cold or at room temperature. I’ve also chosen Annie’s recipe for gravadlax, a wonderful alternative to cold smoked fish. I used locally farmed trout instead of salmon for the gravadlax – use what you prefer and what you can afford. For a salad I chose Annie’s couscous salad with pistachios and pomegranate – one of the most beautiful salads to look at with bright green and red specs! I also made her aubergine veggie roast with goat’s cheese and tomatoes.

For dessert I tried Annie’s recipe for salted caramel millionaire’s shortbread – my favourite recipe of the day. These indulgent treats are totally amazing, a little over the top but perfect for a Christmas feast.

Me and Tasha used a selection of Poetry‘s beautiful wooden boards (oval wooden board = R399) to put this spread together, as well as some of their pretty colourful little bowls and placemats (pom-pom placemat = R99). For the shortbread we used a dainty white cake stand (R250) which also comes with a glass dome lid. All of these make beautiful Christmas gifts, so get to Poetry Stores this week and browse their full collection.

Maple roast ham with Dijon mustard, and aubergines with goat’s cheese and tomatoes (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Maple roast ham: (serves 6-8)

  • 1 x 2kg unsmoked gammon, boned and rolled
  • 3 outer stalks of celery, trimmed and sliced
  • 2 carrots, trimmed and sliced
  • 1 leek, trimmed and sliced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 30 ml maple syrup
  • 5 ml black treacle
  • 10 ml English mustard
  1. Place the gammon in a large saucepan, cover with cold water and bring to the boil. Discard the water and start again with fresh water to cover, this time adding the chopped vegetables and bay leaves. Bring to the boil, then maintain at a gently simmer over a low heat for  50 minutes. If necessay, top up with boiling water halfway through.
  2. Heat the oven to 180C. Tranfer the gammon from the saucepan onto a board using two forks. Remove any string around the ham and pull off the rind. Slice the fat at 2cm intervals with a criss-cross pattern, without cutting down as far as the flesh.
  3. Blend the maple syrup, treacle and mustard in a bowl and use this to coat the ham evenly oall over. Place the ham in a roasting tin and pour some stock to cover the base and prevent the drippings burning. Roast for 35-45 minutes until the glaze is mahogany coloured and dry. Leave to cool, then carve at home before your picnic.

Gravadlax with mustard sauce (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Gravadlax: (serves 6-8)

  • 100 g rock salt
  • 100 caster sugar
  • 20 g yellow mustard seeds
  • a small bunch of dill, finely chopped, plus some to serve
  • 900 g salmon/trout fillet, skin-on, pin boned
  • little gem heart leaves or buttered rye bread to serve

Method:

  1. Comine the salt, sugar, mustard seeds and dill in a bowl. Scatter a quarter of the salt mixture over a piece of clingfilm large enough to wrap the two fillets up in when placed on top of each other. Place one fillet skin-down on top, scatter over 2/3 of the reamining mixture, then lay the second fillet on top so the thick part of the fillet is on top of the thin part of the fillet, and they lie flesh to flesh. Scatter over the remaining salt mixture, wrap in the salmon up tightly and then in foil.
  2. Weight the salmon down by placing something heavy on top, then refrigerate for 48 hours, turning the parcel every 12 hours. The sugar and salt will draw the juices out of the salmon and turn into a sticky bring.
  3. Unwrap the salmon and rinse the marinade off the fresh side. ome of the mustard seeds and dill should remain but you will get rid of the excess salt and sugar. Place the fillets skin-side down on the work surface, then pat dry with kitchen paper. Press some chopped dill into the surface.
  4. Trim the edges of the fillets, then slice the gravadlax diagonally off the skin, thicker than you would slice a smoked salmon. Serve with mustard sauce.

Mustard sauce:

  • 150 g soured cream
  • heaped tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • heaped tablespoon wholegrain mustard
  • 15 ml caster sugar

Mix it all together, then leave to stand for 15 minutes for the sugar to melt. Stir again and serve cold.

Couscous salad with pistachios and pomegranates (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Couscous salad with pistachios and pomegranate:

  • 250 ml vegetable stock
  • sea salt
  • a pinch of saffron filaments
  • 200 g couscous
  • seeds of 1 medium pomegranate
  • 75 g shelled pistachios
  • 90 ml chopped coriander
  • 90 ml chopped mint
  • zest of a lemon (finely grated)
  • 15 ml lemon juice
  • 60 ml extra virgin olive oil
  • pomegranate syrup, to serve (optional)

Method:

  1. Bring the stock to the boil in a small saucepan, season with salt, and add the saffron. Pout this over the couscous in a large bowl, then cover and set aside for 30 minutes, stirring halfway through to break up the lumps. Leave to cool completely.
  2. Mix the pomegranate seeds, pistachios, herbs and lemon zest into the couscous. Whisk the lemon juice with the olive oil and some salt, them pour over the salad and toss to coat well.

Aubergine veggie roast with goat’s cheese and tomatoes: (serves 6)

  •  3 aubergines, sliced into 3cm thick rounds
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • 300 g cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 150 g young firm goat’s cheese, cut into 1cm thick dice
  • coarsely chopped parsley

Method:

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 200C.
  2. Lay the aubergine slices out on a couple of baking trays. Brush with oil on both sides and season with salt & pepper. Roast for 20 minutes, then turn and cook for another 15 minutes until golden brown.
  3. At the same time, scatter a little salt over the tomatoes in a bowl and set aside.
  4. Transfer the aubergines to a large roasting dish that holds them in a single layer. Pour 3 tablespoons of oil over the tomatoes, and gently toss, then mix with the goats cheese. Pile this on top of the aubergines, them return to the oven for 5 minutes to warm through. Remove from the oven and leave to cool. Scatter with parsley.

Salt caramel millionaire’s shortbread (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Salted caramel millionaire’s shortbread:

For the shortbread:

  • 225 g unsalted butter, chilled and diced
  • 100 g caster sugar
  • 200 g plain flour
  • 115 g ground almonds
  • 5 ml vanilla extract

For the caramel:

  • 100 g unsalted butter
  • 70 g caster sugar
  • 15 ml golden syrup
  • 275 g Caramel Treat (or dulce de leche)
  • 1/3 teaspoon sea salt

For the top:

  • 200 g dark chocolate, roughly chopped
  • 25 g white chocolate chips (optional)

Method:

  • Place all the ingredients for the shortbread in a food processor and whizz to form a dough. Press into a buttered baking tin (27 x 18 cm), then prick with a fork and refrigerate for 1 hour.
  • Pre-heat oven to 140 C, then bake the shortbread for 45 minutes. Leave to cool.
  • Place all the ingredients for the caramel in a small saucepan and bring to the boil, stirring well. Simmer gently for 8 minutes, stirring often, then pour over the shortbread base and leave to cool completely.
  • Melt the chocolate in a bowl set over a pan of simmering water, then pour over the caramel and smooth the top. If you want to marble the surface, melt the white chocolate in the same way, then drop 1/4 teaspoons on top of the dark, marbling it with a cocktail stick. Work quickly.
  • Set aside in a cool place until set but still soft, then cut into squares and chill. Store in an airtight container.

 

Credits:

All recipes by Annie Bell, from her book The Picnic Cookbook.

Food preparation & text: Ilse van der Merwe of The Food Fox

Photography: Tasha Seccombe

Styling: Ilse van der Merwe & Tasha Seccombe

Homeware: Poetry Stores

A casual summer holiday lunch with Poetry Stores: Part 1

6 Dec

A casual Summer lunch or brunch (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

If there is one word that sums up 2013 for me, it would be “inspiration”. This year has been a great year of being surrounded by truly inspirational peers, clients and friends, and it is the theme of this 3 part festive series that I have put together in association with Poetry Stores.

We’ve reached the end of 2013, and we are all starting to get ready for a well-deserved break! I’ve teamed up with Poetry Stores to bring you fantastic ideas and inspiration for festive meals, recipes, gifts, decor and homeware. With each part of this series I have chosen a recipe book from Poetry’s collection, featuring 4 or 5 of the most scrumptious recipes from each book, along with a selection of beautifully festive homeware that you can use to decorate your table or wrap as Christmas gifts to your nearest and dearest. Remember that recipe books also make amazing Christmas gifts, and they keep on giving us fresh ideas right through the year!

For the first feature, I have chosen the theme of “A Casual Summer Holiday Lunch” with recipes from Café Food at Home by Evan Faul from Quivertree Publications (available from Poetry Stores). Evan is a master at baking, so I simply had to try his recipe for ciabatta. He also features a beautiful recipe for a sandwich in his book, made from the same ciabatta, and filled with garlic & thyme roasted chicken, red pepper pesto & mayonnaise, fresh basil leaves and finely sliced red onion, and I couldn’t resist. For dessert, I chose Evan’s recipe for a white chocolate cheesecake with a chocolate biscuit crust, topped with fresh seasonal berries – a show stopping dessert!

Evan’s book is filled with easy, scrumptious recipes of the food that I really love to eat: it is unpretentious, beautifully photographed, and lipsmackingly delicious. Café food, bistro food, inspiration for laid back holiday food. Serve with you favourite beer or some ice cold white wine.

Poetry’s range of beautiful wooden boards, Wonkiware platters and inhouse tableware will make any feast look picture perfect.  Here’s what we’ve used in the pictures:

Large round bread board:  R499

Baguette board:  Small baguette board R199

Large Wonkiware regtangular trough: R599

Wonkiware bowl: R140

Wonkiware cake plate: R350

Tumbler glass: R40

Ciabatta loaf (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Ciabatta: Ingredients

For the “rustic poolish” (starter dough):

  • 400 ml cold water
  • 270 g bread flour
  • 130 g unsifted wholewheat flour
  • 3 g instant yeast (about 5 ml)

For the ciabatta loaf:

  • 375 g bread flour
  • 2 g instant yeast
  • 375 g rustic poolish (see above)
  • 10 g salt
  • 240 ml iced water

Method:

  1. For the rustig poolish, place all the ingredients in the bowl of your stand mixer, then mix well for a couple of minutes with your flat beater. Transfer the mixture to a plastic container, and cover with a damp cloth. Place in the fridge overnight for use the next day.
  2. The next day, place the rest of the ingredients except the salt and water in the mixer. Mix for 3 minutes on slow speed while adding the iced water.  Mix for 4 minutes on medium speed.
  3. Keep on mixing while you add the salt. Mix for a further 6 minutes on medium speed. Transfer to a clean, lightly oiled container, cover with a damp cloth, then leave in a warm area in the kitchen to ferment for 2 hours. Fold the dough after 4o minutes, and again after 80 minutes.
  4. Turn out the dough onto a flour-dusted work surface. Dust the surface of the dough with flour, using a sieve to avoid any lumps. Gently stretch the dough into a rectangle using your hands.
  5. Carefully divide the dough into 2 portions. Roll the pieces very gently in the dusting flour so that they are evenly coated. Place the dough portions on a well floured cloth and prove for 60 minutes.
  6. Place a terracotta baking stone (if you have one) in the oven, and preheat the oven to 250 C for at least an hour before baking.
  7. Transfer the breads onto a teflon sheet. Mist the oven with water using a spray bottle, before loading the loaves on the hot stone in the oven (I don’t have a baking stone, but I preheated a normal baking tray). Bake for 15 minutes, then reduce the temp to 220 C for a further 10 minutes. The bread should be golden brown. Remove from the oven and let it cool.

Chicken lemon & thyme roast (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Chicken, lemon & thyme roast:

  • 1 whole head of garlic
  • 10 free-range chicken thighs and breasts on the bone (I used a mixed pack of chicken pieces)
  • 75 ml good quality olive oil
  • small bunch fresh thyme
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 lemons
  • 2 onions, peeled

Method:

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 200 C.
  2. Cut the head of garlic in half horizontally. Use it to rub the skin of the chicken pieces. Break up the head of garlic but do not peel the cloves.
  3. Place the chicken pieces and garlic in a bowl. Add the olive oil, thyme and seasoning. Cut the lemons in half, and cut the onions in 1/8 segments. Add the lemons and onions to the bowl, then use your hands to gently toss all the ingredients together. Tip it out onto a flat roasting tray lined with foil, then spread them out in a single layer, chicken pieces skin side up.
  4. Roast for 25 minutes until the chicken is crisp, brown and juicy. (I turned down the oven to 180 C and roasted for another 20 minutes).
  5. Remove the chicken from the oven, then use tongs to squeeze the caramelized lemon over the meat before serving.

Roasted red pepper pesto (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Roast tomato & red pepper pesto:

  • 2 large red peppers, cored seeded and cut into quarters
  • 2 ripe tomatoes, cut into quarters
  • 15 ml olive oil for roasting
  • 1 clove  garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 60 g parmesan cheese, finely grated
  • 35 g pine nuts
  • 25 g cashew nuts
  • 5 ml balsamic vinegar
  • 20 g basil leaves (optional)
  • 100 ml good quality olive oil for blending
  • salt & pepper
  • 1 lemon

Method:

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 180 C.
  2. Arrange the peppers and tomatoes skin sides down on a roasting tray. Drizzle with oil and roast for 15 minutes.
  3. Place the garlic, cheese, pine nuts, cashew nuts, and vinegar in a food processor and blend together gently. Add the roasted peppers, tomatoes and basil (if using) and blend at low speeds.
  4. With the processor running, slowly add 100 ml oil in a steady stream (depending on the thickness you require, adjust the amount of olive oil). Season to taste and finish off with a squeeze of lemon juice.
  5. Place in an airtight container or in a sterilized glass jar in the fridge – it should keep for about 2 weeks in the fridge.

Roast chicken sandwich (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Roast chicken sandwich:

  • 400 g lemon chicken & thyme roast (see above)
  • 100 g roast tomato & red pepper pesto (see above)
  • 100 g mayonnaise
  • 10 g smoked paprika
  • salt & pepper
  • 1 loaf ciabatta (see above)
  • 100 ml good quality olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled
  • 1/2 tomato
  • 1/2 red onion, finely sliced
  • a few basil leaves
  • a few gherkins

Method:

  1. Flake the chicken from the bone, then add the pesto, mayo, paprika and seasoning. Mix well.
  2. Slice the ciabatta in half lengthways. Drizzle the cut sides with olive oil and season with salt & pepper. Toast under a hot grill under golden brown.
  3. Remove bread from the oven, then rub with garlic and then with the cut side of the tomato half.
  4. Spread the bread with the chicken mayo mixture. Layer red onion and basil leaves on top and cover with the other half of the toasted bread. Slice into portions and serve with gherkins on the side.

Baked white chocolate cheesecake (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Baked white chocolate cheesecake:

  • 200 g chocolate biscuits
  • 90 g butter, melted
  • 400 g best quality white chocolate
  • 750 g full fat cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 5 ml vanilla extract
  • 230 g sugar
  • 3 large eggs
  • 250 ml single cream, chilled and whipped
  • mixed seasoning berries, to serve

Method:

  1. Crush biscuits in a food processor, then mix in the melted butter. Press mixture firmly into the bottom and sides of a well-greased 23 x 8 cm springform cake tin.
  2. Pre-heat oven to 150 C.
  3. Break chocolate into chunks and place in a glass or metal bowl. Melt gently over a pot of simmering water.
  4. Beat cream cheese lightly with a hand blender. Add vanilla extract, sugar and melted chocolate and mix well.
  5. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, and then fold in the whipped cream. Pour onto the prepared biscuit crust, then bake for 1 hour.
  6. Switch off the oven and allow the cake to cool completely in the oven before removing from the tin.
  7. Serve with seasonal berries.

Credits:

All recipes by Evan Faul, from his book Café Food at Home.

Food preparation & text: Ilse van der Merwe of The Food Fox

Photography: Tasha Seccombe

Styling: Ilse van der Merwe & Tasha Seccombe

Homeware: Poetry Stores

Spinach ravioli with smoked mozzarella & fresh tomato sauce

6 Aug

Spinach ravioli stuffed with smoked mozzarella and ricotta, topped with fresh tomato sauce (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

This Friday we’ll be celebrating Women’s Day – a day where we are reminded that women played a big role in South Africa’s human rights history.  Back in 1965, a group of very brave women staged a silent march in Pretoria in front of the Union Buildings, against legislation that required African people to carry a special identification document which curtailed an African’s freedom of movement during the apartheid era.

It’s amazing how far we’ve come since 1965. Today, Women’s Day celebrates the respect, love and appreciation of women throughout South Africa. To me, it is not a political day, it is a day where we can treat each other with a little extra care and indulgence, just because we deserve it!

With the help of Poetry stores, I chose a recipe from the amazing book The Italian Cookery Course by Katie Kaldesi (available from Poetry). Being very sceptical of Italian cookery books (because everyone claims to cook like the Italians!), I approached this book with caution. But after spending a few minutes paging through the beautiful recipes and stories, I realised that this book is very authentic. I just couldn’t put it down. It might be my favourite recipe book of 2013 so far – a real inspiration for anyone who really enjoys traditional Italian recipes and ingredients.

Katie Caldesi was nominated for many awards after writing this book, and I can see why. She captures the soul of the people that feature in the book, and it translates onto the recipe pages. I look forward to spending much more time with this amazing book, and I’ll surely feature more recipes in the near future.

The recipe that I chose to feature for Women’s Day from The Italian Cookery Course, is part of a masterclass feature in the book: “Spinach pasta stuffed with smoked mozzarella with fresh tomato sauce”. It’s a bright green spinach pasta, filled with smoked mozzarella cheese and ricotta, topped with Giovanna’s fresh tomato sauce and freshly grated parmesan cheese. It is simply sublime in flavour, rich from the cheese filling, yet light from the fresh tomatoes in the sauce. It is a beautiful plate of Italian goodness, perfect for a Women’s Day celebration.

May every lady out there feel special on Friday. I love being a woman!

Ingredients for Fresh Tomato Sauce: (serves 6)

  • 1kg fresh, ripe and very red tomatoes, quartered
  • 10 basil leaves
  • 1 medium red onion, peeled and quartered
  • 5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed or finely grated
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 heaped teaspoon caster sugar (optional)
  • grated parmesan cheese, to serve

Method:

  1. Put the tomatoes, basil, and onion in a large heavybased saucepan over medium heat (no oil!). Cover the pan, shaking it frequently, and leave on the heat for 45 minutes until the tomatoes have released their juices and softened. Remove the basil leaves.
  2. Use a stick blender and whizz up the tomatoes to a smooth puree, skins and all.
  3. Heat the oil in a pan and add the garlic. Fry over medium heat until it becomes fragrant, then add the pureed tomatoes.
  4. Bring to the boil, then simmer uncovered for 30-45 minutes until the mixture has reduced and the flavour has become concentrated. Season to taste with salt, pepper and sugar.

Ingredients for Smoked Mozzarella Filling:

  • 250 g smoked mozzarella (or scamorza)
  • 150 g ricotta
  • a good pinch of ground nutmeg
  • salt, to taste

Method:

  1. In a mixing bowl, mix all the ingredients well. Be careful with the salt as the mozzarella is already salty.

Rolling out the green pasta dough with my pasta machine (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

Ingredients for Spinach Pasta Ravioli: (I have adapted this recipe by mixing the dough in my food processor, but you can also mix it by hand)

  • 200 g fresh spinach (or 100g cooked spinach)
  • 2 XL eggs
  • 300 g flour, plus a little extra
  1. Cook the spinach first: I like to sautee the spinach leaves with olive oil in a large pan until it has wilted, then remove from the heat and let it cool. Spinach will lose about 50% of it’s weight after being cooked, so we are looking for about 100g cooked spinach for the rest of the recipe.
  2. When the spinach has cooled, place it in a small mixing jug with one of the eggs, then blend with a stick blender to a smooth green paste.
  3. Add the flour, remaining egg, and green paste to your food processor, then mix until you get a ball of dough that starts to come together (it only takes about 20-30 seconds).
  4. Remove the dough from the processor bowl, then place it on a floured wooden board and press together into a ball. Wrap in clingfilm and leave to rest for 20 minutes.
  5. Using a pasta machine, roll out the dough, one piece at a time, to a thickness of about 1mm (almost thinnest setting). Lightly dust the pasta while working with it.
  6. Placing balls of filling on the pasta sheets (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

    Lay out the sheet of pasta on a lightly dusted surface to prevent sticking. Place heaped teaspoons of stuffing on one side of each sheet (lengthways), then fold it over and press down to stick the 2 layers together. If your pasta sheets look dry, use a pastry brush and water to make the surface a bit sticky before folding it. Make sure to press out any air bubbles around the stuffing.

  7. Fold the pasta sheets over the filling, then press down around it to get rid of air pockets before cutting it into squares (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

    Use a fluted pastry cutter (or pizza wheel cutter) to cut the ravioli into squares, aiming to leave about 2cm between the end of the filling and the edge of the pasta square. Place the ravioli on a lightly floured tray, spaced apart in a single layer. Set aside until ready to cook, but not longer than an hour otherwise it will start to stick to the surface. You can also freeze them at this stage.

  8. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil.  Cook the ravioli for 3-5 minutes (until al dente), then drain through a colander – the filling will completely melt on the inside, so don’t be alarmed if the ravioli look “deflated”, just handle with care! Serve with the fresh tomato sauce (see recipe above) and top with grated parmesan cheese.

Credits:

Photographer: Tasha Seccombe

Food preparation: Ilse van der Merwe

Styling: Tasha Seccombe & Ilse van der Merwe

All recipes from: The Italian Cookery Course by Katie Caldesi, available from Poetry stores at R295

Bracelet: Poetry stores, R30 (Poetry supports the Ikamva Labantu programme to empower women. Proceeds from this handmade bracelet provide earnings and upskilling for local bracelet-makers as well as enterprise development opportunities in South Africa.)

Large plate, smaller bowls and wooden spoon: Wonki Ware from Poetry stores (ranging from R65-R399)

 

Good old-fashioned apple pie

1 Apr

Annie Bell’s old fashioned apple pie with rum and raisins (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

For the last course in my 3-part Easter collaboration with Poetry stores, I am featuring a recipe for “Good Old-fashioned Apple pie” from Annie Bell’s Baking Bible. Annie Bell is an award winning and respected food writer, and every recipe in her book is triple-tested.

Apple pie is such a classic favourite and suitable for almost any occasion. There are literally thousands of recipes out there to choose from, but this recipe really is just what it claims to be: good and old-fashioned. The flavours are simple, yet perfectly balanced. With very little sugar added, the apples retain their tart flavours. And with a dollop of clotted cream, I felt like I was sitting on someone’s grandmother’s porch, delighting in the comfort of my old-fashioned pie.

It was quite interesting to find that Annie doesn’t add any spices to her pie – no cinnamon, no cloves, no nutmeg. BUT, hang in there, there’s a good 2 tablespoons of rum in there (left to soak into the raising) which adds fabulous flavour.

Ingredients for pastry:

  • 450 g flour
  • 250 g cold butter, cut into cubes
  • 100 g icing sugar
  • 1 egg yolk
  • some cold water

Ingredients for filling:

  • 50 g raisins
  • 30 ml dark rum
  • 600 g cooking apples (like Granny Smith or Bramley) – skinned, cored and thickly sliced
  • 300 g eating apples (like Pink Lady) – skinned, cored and thickly sliced
  • 100 g golden caster sugar (I used light brown sugar)
  • 15 ml flour

Method:

  1. Place the flour and butter in a food processor, and pulse until it looks like fine breadcrumbs.
  2. Add the icing sugar and give it another quick pulse, then add the egg yolk and process for a few seconds. Add a tablespoon of water to the mixture, then pulse until it just starts to come together. Add more water if needed, but not too much.
  3. Wrap the pastry in clingfilm, then refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  4. Pre-heat the oven to 180 C.
  5. Place the raisins and dark rum in a small bowl, then microwave for 30 seconds. Let it stand to soak. (Annie prefers to soak the raisins overnight without adding any heat, I just use a microwave to speed up the process.)
  6. In a large bowl, toss the apples with the sugar and flour, then add the soaked raisins and brandy. Mix well.
  7. Remove the pastry from the fridge, then roll out 2/3 of it on a lightly floured surface. Use the rolled out pastry to line a greased baking tin/dish of about 30 cm (oval) or 25 cm (round).  The edges should hang over the sides of the tin.
  8. Tip the filling mixture into the pastry base, then spread it out evenly.
  9. Paint the edges of the pastry with milk (where it would meet the top layer). Now roll out the remaining 1/3 of the pastry, and use it to cover the top. Now trim the excess pastry, and use a fork to lightly press the 2 layers together.
  10. Brush all over with milk, then dust with sugar.
  11. Bake for 45 minutes until the top is golden brown. Remove from the oven, then let it stand for 10 minutes before serving hot with whipped or clotted cream.

Credits:

Recipe from: Annie Bell’s Baking Bible (available from Poetry stores)

Photography: Tasha Seccombe

All homeware: Poetry stores (ranging from R159-399)

Marinated seared leg of lamb with chermoula and pine nuts

25 Mar

Marinated seared leg of lamb with chermoula and pine nuts (photography by Tasha Seccombe)

In a few days we will be celebrating Easter weekend, a holiday that is usually spent with family and good friends. Last week I shared the first recipe of a 3 part series that I am doing in a special Easter collaboration with Poetry stores: salmon bisque for starters. Today I am sharing a phenomenal recipe for a festive lunch: marinated seared leg of lamb with chermoula and pine nuts from A Week In The Kitchen by Karen Dudley.

Contrary to what most of us are used to, this butterflied leg of lamb is not slow roasted for countless hours, but rather seared in a pan and then roasted at 200 C for only 45 minutes. The meat is then rested and cooled, then carved thinly and served at room temperature. That means that all the stress of heating up large roasts at the last minute is totally irrelevant. It is served with a fresh and fragrant chermoula paste – a fabulous North African way to bring loads of extra flavour to cooked meat. A few toasted pine nuts perfects the picture. This recipe is certainly a must for stress-free scrumptious entertaining!

Ingredients for marinade:

  • 3 sprigs of rosemary, finely chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • zest of 2 lemons
  • juice of 3 lemons
  • 310 ml extra virgin olive oil

Ingredients for searing the meat:

  • 2,5 kg butterflied deboned leg of lamb (marinated for 30 hours – see marinade above)
  • 15 ml of your favourite meat rub (or use a blend of salt, white pepper, paprika, dried mixed herbs, and a pinch of sugar)
  • 15 ml vegetable oil

Ingredients for chermoula paste:

  • 30 g fresh coriander
  • 30 g flat leaf parsley
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 30 ml lemon juice
  • 5 ml ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon chilli flakes
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 60 ml extra virgin olive oil

For serving:

  • 40 g pine nuts, toasted

Method:

  1. Mix all ingredients for the marinade together in a large glass/ceramic bowl or baking dish. Place the leg of lamb in the marinade and leave to marinate (covered) in the fridge for 30 hours.
  2. Remove the lamb from the fridge and return it to room temperature (it takes about 2 hours).
  3. Pre-heat the oven to 200 C.
  4. Heat your largest pan on high heat until it is super hot. White the pan is heating, season the meat all over with your meat rub. When the pan is smoking hot, add the vegetable oil, then sear the meat on all sides, starting with the fat side. Use tongs to turn it.
  5. Place the seared leg fat side up on a baking tray, then roast for 45 minutes at 200 C.
  6. Remove the meat from the oven, then allow to rest and cool before carving into very thin slivers. Arrange it on a platter and serve with chermoula paste and toasted pine nuts (I also added some couscous to the platter).

Credits:

Recipe from: A Week In The Kitchen by Karen Dudley (R225 from Poetry Stores)

Photography: Tasha Seccombe

All homeware: Poetry stores (ranging from R199-399)

Salmon bisque

18 Mar

A hearty salmon bisque from Savour. Photography by Tasha Seccombe.

It’s time to start planning your Easter menu – no holiday can be complete without some serious culinary indulgence! Over the next 3 weeks I’ll be featuring 3 recipes from 3 cookbooks, all available from Poetry stores as part of our special Easter collaboration.

First on the menu is a thick salmon bisque, the recipe taken from Savour by Marc Hirschowitz, Karen Alsfine and Estelle Sacharowitz. This hearty soup is perfect as a starter, but can easily be eaten as a main course served with freshly baked bread. The most interesting part of this recipe is that it is made with tinned salmon and tinned cream of tomato soup – basic pantry ingredients that makes this dish also possible on a camping trip! But if you have access to great fresh salmon, fresh tomatoes and cream, it would take the soup to new heights.

The recipe states that you can serve it chunky or smooth – I prefer a smooth and thick bisque, easily achieved with the help of a stick blender.

Ingredients:

  • 30 ml olive oil
  • 200 g mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped or crushed
  • 30 ml cornflour
  • 500 ml milk
  • 2 vegetable stock cubes, crumbled
  • 1 x 415 g tin salmon, deboned and flakes (or 400 g flaked cooked salmon)
  • 1 x 400 g tin cream of tomato soup (or 400 g skinless grated tomatoes with 1/4 cup cream)
  • 5 ml sugar
  • 2,5 ml Worcester sauce
  • 8 spring onions, finely chopped
  • 10 ml finely chopped fresh chilli
  • 30 ml sherry
  • fresh cream for serving
  • chopped parsley for serving
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • freshly ground red peppercorns for garnish (optional)

Method:

  1. Heat the oil in a large pot, then add the mushrooms, onion and garlic. Fry over medium heat until they are soft.
  2. Add the cornflour, then stir. Now slowly add the milk and stir well. Add the crumbled stock cubes and stir well.
  3. Add the flaked salmon and stir well. Add the tomato soup (or fresh tomatoes and cream), sugar, Worcestershire sauce, spring onions and chilli.
  4. Add the sherry and stir, then simmer for 15-20 minutes until the soup thickens.
  5. If your soup is too thick, add more water of milk. If you like a smooth consistency, use a stick blender to create a smooth texture. Taste the soup and add salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Serve with a swirl of cream and some chopped parsley (and optionally freshly ground red peppercorns).

Credits:

Photography: Tasha Seccombe

Homeware and linen: Poetry stores, ranging from R99-R299.

Recipe from Savour, available from Poetry stores at R350.

 

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