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Classic Cape tomato bredie

3 Aug

Classic South African tomato bredie with rice, served with Cape of Good Hope Riebeeksrivier Syrah (photography by Tasha Seccombe, ceramics by Mervyn Gers)

 

The perfumed fragrance of this humble Cape favourite will seduce you into second helpings. It matches perfectly with the Cape of Good Hope Riebeeksrivier Syrah from Anthonij Rupert Wines – a savoury red wine made from grapes from the Swartland, with light peppery spice notes and plum fruit flavours, bold and structured. Don’t substitute canned tomatoes for fresh ones – the magic lies in using fresh. The colour of your bredie will depend on the colour and ripeness of your tomatoes – don’t be alarmed if it is less red than in the picture, just use the ripest and reddest tomatoes you can find. Use a food processor to help with the dicing, if you want to skip some labour.

Ingredients: (serves 6)

  • 45 ml olive oil
  • 1,5 kg lamb/mutton rib chunks (or neck chops)
  • salt & pepper
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole peppercorns
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole cloves
  • 4 whole cardamom seeds
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely grated
  • a knob of fresh ginger, finely grated (1-2 tablespoons)
  • 1,2 kg ripe tomatoes, diced
  • 5 ml sugar
  • 4 medium potatoes, diced (optional)
  • cooked jasmin/basmati rice, to serve

Method:

In a large heavy based pot over medium-high heat, add the oil. Add the rib chunks and fry on the fatty side until brown, seasoning with salt & pepper as you go (fry in batches if necessary). Remove the meat and turn down the heat to low.
Add the onions, cloves, cardamom & cinnamon sticks. Fry until translucent and soft, stirring often. Add the garlic and ginger and fry for another minute.
Add the tomatoes and sugar (and potatoes, optionally), and stir to loosen any sticky bits on the bottom of the pot. Bring the mixture to a simmer, then place the meat back into the pot and stir.
Cover with a lid, then simmer over low heat for about 1,5 hours or until the meat is very soft and falls from the bone. You can remove the bones with tongs at this point, if you want to. Taste and add more salt & pepper if necessary. Serve hot with fluffy warm rice.

Note: This recipe was developed exclusively for Cape of Good Hope Wines, recipe/food preparation/styling by Ilse van der Merwe, photography/styling by Tasha Seccombe.

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Celebrating Bastille Festival with Leopard’s Leap

5 Jul

Leopard’s Leap’s Bastille Festival delivery menu for two, available online at R365 (excl wine and dessert).

 

Franschhoek’s annual Bastille Festival is taking place virtually this year, making room for everyone to enjoy the festival from a safe distance within Covid-19 circumstances. Leopard’s Leap has joined in the French-inspired fun with a delivery menu from their popular rotisserie restaurant. They sent me this week’s classic French menu for two, consisting of the following (R365 for two, available 1-11 July 2020):

Deboned and rolled beef neck bourguignon

Lyonnaise potatoes

Dalewood Camembert (60g) with garlic, parsley, tarragon, extra virgin olive oil and chardonnay

Freshly baked sour dough bread

Grilled and marinated ratatouille vegetables with rosemary and tomatoes

Add your choice of dessert at an extra cost, or kids pizza meals – we tried the Pear, muscat and lemon clafouti with crème fraiche (R60 for two), an incredibly light crumb with the softest fruit, as well as the BBQ Pork Pizza (R85).

We couldn’t help but lay a table to enjoy this feast! What a delightful way to experience some local French flair in the comfort of your own home. Take a look at my pictures:

Two of Leopard’s Leap’s wines that we enjoyed as part of this feast: The Culinaria Pinot Noir Chardonnay (R110) and the Culinaria Grand Vin (R125) – both available for purchase online.

 

Deboned and rolled beef neck bourguignon – meltingly tender and boneless, rich and hearty. I added some of my own rocket leaves for a touch of green.

 

Perfectly golden Lyonnaise potatoes.

 

Grilled and marinated ratatouille vegetables with rosemary and oven dried tomatoes. The portions were very generous – there were two tubs like these, but I only plated one.

 

A beautiful medium-size freshly baked sourdough loaf with butter – perfect to enjoy with the baked camembert.

 

Such a simple addition, but so stellar: baked Dalewood Camembert (60g) with garlic, parsley, tarragon, extra virgin olive oil and chardonnay.

 

Sweet endings with the most delightfully light and moist pear clafoutis with crème fraiche. French simplicity at its finest.

 

Leopard’s Leap’s French-inspired Culinaria wine range is also available for purchase online – free shipping on any online order of 6 bottles or more, and you receive a free recipe booklet (valid 1-11 July 2020). The wines are all designed to be exceptional food partners.

Leopard’s Leap’s Rotisserie Restaurant will reopen for both Bastille Festival weekends (Fri-Sun, 09h00-16h00, 3-5 July and 10-12 July 2020) – the same menu that’s available for delivery. They’ve taken all the necessary safety measures, and luckily they have a lot of open spaces and fresh air.

Follow #FHKBastilleFest to see all the French festivities taking place until 11th July 2020, and check out Leopard’s Leap’s Facebook page.

 

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Chocolate eclairs with salted caramel custard and pecan brittle

28 Apr

 

During lockdown, many of my readers have shared how they are cooking recipes from my blog. It’s such a wonderful feeling – to know that my recipes can provide others with a little pleasure and inspiration during a very uncertain and serious time! Thank you so much for all of your feedback, photos, comments and shares. It makes me feel warm and valued, and it is a shining beacon carrying me through this uncertainty with all of you.

I am at a point where I’m searching for recipes that will bring the most amount of joy, for the least amount of money. With a limited spectrum of recreation and entertainment available during lockdown, baking and cooking has become just that: a recreational activity. Yet with limited funds because of limited (or no) work opportunities, many of us need to get really creative in making the most of what we have, while still feeding our families. Every now and then, a special homemade treat can provide some kind of light hearted escape from the gloom that otherwise hangs over all of us. And for me, in allowing myself this special joy, I choose hope.

One of my friends, Anele Horn, recently sent me a photograph of her homemade chocolate eclairs – she used a recipe from my blog that I haven’t made in years. Then I remembered that basic eclairs (choux pastries) are made of a handful of very simple ingredients: water, flour, eggs, sugar, salt. I also remembered that a custard filling can be made of very simple ingredients too: milk, eggs, sugar, vanilla, cornstarch. I found a recipe online for making salted caramel flavoured custard, because hey, it sounded like a good idea. With the addition of a simple caramel syrup (made from sugar and a little water) and some salt, I made a salted caramel custard perfect for piping into the choux buns, without buying a single exotic ingredient. So when my husband went to buy a few essential fresh supplies, I asked him to buy 2 slabs of the cheapest dark chocolate he could find (they costed R11,99 each) for the topping. I found a handful of pecan pieces in our cupboard (the last of my “lockdown” nut supply) and with a little extra effort I made a simple nut brittle (using just sugar and the nuts) that I chopped up for decoration at the end.

 

These were some of the best sweet treats we’ve had the pleasure of enjoying in the past 5 weeks, and we only spent R24 (excluding the cost of the basic ingredients that we had in the house). The recipe makes about 21 medium size eclairs. I do hope that you’ll try it – SO worth the effort!

Notes for substitutions: You can also use whipped sweetened cream to fill the eclairs, and a very economical cocoa glaze for the top (if you have cocoa powder and icing sugar in your pantry). And yes, you can certainly also use cheaper peanuts for the brittle!

Notes on effort/skill levels:

  • The choux buns are moderately easy to make, but the following tools will make the process easier: a digital scale, an electric mixer (stand mixer) and a piping bag. Without these, you’re going to apply some decent elbow grease for mixing, and you won’t be able to pipe rows (just use two spoons instead to create round choux “balls”).
  • The salted caramel custard requires medium skill levels and time. It is best to make it the day before you want to make the eclairs, to split the effort into 2 days. Make the caramel first, let it cool, and then use it to make the custard. Let the custard cool completely before making the choux buns.
  • The nut brittle requires medium skill levels, but only because you’re working with very hot melted sugar that requires timing – otherwise it’s a simple recipe with only 2 ingredients. It is an optional extra, but I promise you it delivers BIG on added texture, luxury and flavour.
  • To melt chocolate: I do it in the microwave, so it should be easy enough. Just follow the instructions and be patient.

 

Ingredients: (makes about 21 medium size eclair buns)

For the salted caramel custard filling: (recipe adapted from Jo The Tart Queen)

  • 200 ml (170 g) white granulated sugar
  • 60 ml (1/4 cup) tap water
  • 80 ml (1/3 cup) hot water from a recently boiled kettle
  • 500 ml (2 cups) milk, preferably full-cream
  • 5 ml vanilla extract
  • 125 g egg yolks (about 7 XL yolks)
  • 50 g (about 7 tablespoons or 105 ml) cornflour
  • 50 g butter, cubed
  • salt, to taste (I used about 1/2 teaspoon salt flakes, but if you’re using fine salt, use less)

To make the caramel: place the sugar and tap water in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Let it come to a boil without stirring, only tilting the pan now and then. Boil until it changes colour to a light golden, and get your hot water ready. When it reaches a darker amber caramel colour, carefully add the hot water all at one (if will splutter!), then remove from the heat at once, tilting it from side to side to mix. Set aside to cool completely – you’ll use it later for the custard.

To make the custard: Place the milk and vanilla in a medium size pot over medium heat. While it is heating, whisk the yolks with the cooled caramel in a mixing bowl, then add the cornflour and whisk again to mix well. When the milk just starts to simmer, pour it carefully into the yolk mixture, whisking constantly. Now pour the mixture back into the pot and place over medium heat. Stir constantly, until the custard starts to thicken. Continue stirring until it makes a few slow boiling bubbles, then lower the heat to very low and cook for at least another minute or too until it becomes very thick. Remove from the heat, then  stir in the butter.  When melted, season with salt – you don’t want the salt to be overpowering, but you want to taste it. Transfer the custard to a wide container and cover with a layer of clingfilm to prevent a skin from forming, then leave to cool fully. Keep refrigerated until ready to use (will keep for up to 5 days in the refrigerator).

For the choux pastry:

  • 250 ml (1 cup) water
  • 2,5 ml (1/4 teaspoon) salt
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) sugar
  • 65 g (1/4 cup plus 1 teaspoon) butter, cubed if cold
  • 140 g (250 ml / 1 cup) white bread flour or cake flour
  • 3 XL eggs

Method:

Preheat the oven to 220 C. Add water, salt, sugar and butter to a small saucepan. Heat until the butter melts, then bring to the boil. As soon as the mixture starts to boil, add the flour all at once and stir vigorously with a wooden spoon, cooking the paste until it thickens and pulls into a ball (it takes about 20 seconds for the mixture to form a ball). Remove from the heat at once and transfer the ball to the bowl of an electric mixer (if doing by hand, transfer to a large mixing bowl). With the K-beater fitted, turn on the mixer on medium-low, releasing steam from the hot flour mixture. Now add the eggs one at a time, mixing until it comes together before adding another (it will look like it is splitting at first, but be patient, it will come together). Continue until the mixture is smooth and glossy but still stiff enough to hold shape. Transfer the mixture to a piping bag, then pipe buns of about 8 cm long and 2,5 cm wide on a greased/lined baking sheet, leaving enough space between them for swelling (or use two spoons to drop balls of paste on the baking sheet). Bake in a pre-heated oven at 220 C for 10 minutes, then reduce heat to 160 C for 25-30 minutes (smaller buns will take 10-15 minutes) until the buns are golden brown and crisp to the touch. Remove from the oven and pierce with a small sharp knife to allow steam to escape. Leave to cool completely before filling.

For the nut brittle: (optional)

  • 1/4 cup white sugar
  • 1/3 cup chopped pecan nuts

Have a small baking tray ready, lined with non-stick baking paper. Place the sugar in a small pan or pot over moderately high heat. Leave until the sugar starts to melt (without adding any liquid), gently tipping the pan from side to side. When the sugar has melted, it will change colour. Watch it carefully, gently tipping the pan now and then, until it is a deep amber colour. Remove from the heat and add the nuts at once, tipping the pan to coat all over (only a few seconds). Tip out on the lined baking tray, using a silicone spatula to remove from the pan (work quickly before the caramel hardens). Use the spatula to flatten the brittle slightly. Leave to cool completely, then chop into smaller pieces for topping your eclairs. (Preferably don’t make this too long ahead, as it will become sticky again on standing. Keep in an airtight container, when completely cooled.)

For assembly:

  • about 150-180 g dark chocolate, broken into pieces

Remove the cooled custard from the fridge, use a whisk to mix it to a smooth consistency, then transfer to a piping bag. Cut the buns open on one side horizontally, then pipe the filling into each one. To melt the chocolate, place it in a microwave-safe bowl and heat for 30 seconds at a time, stirring inbetween with a spatula. After about the third or fourth session, it should be warm enough and fully melted. Spread each bun with chocolate on top (or transfer the chocolate to a small plastic bag or piping bag, and snip off the one corner to neatly pipe onto the buns). Top with a few shards of brittle. Store any leftovers in the refrigerator.

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Smoked snoek and artichoke pie

24 Apr

An old-fashioned smoky fish pie is one of the most comforting dishes to eat in my opinion, and a firm favourite from my childhood days.

 

I’ve been craving a smoked fish pie for weeks (because of a packet of smoked snoek in my freezer) and I finally got to baking one. This must be one of the most comforting things to eat – creamy and packed with smoky flavour, plus an easy press-in crust with zero sogginess that’s made with cheese, resulting in a crispy, flaky coating all around the pie that tastes like grilled cheddar crackers.

I’ve combined a few recipes into one, consulting my sister’s notes from her handwritten recipe collection plus her favourite recipe from Kook & Geniet, as well as Heilie Pienaar’s chapter for savoury pies and tarts from The Ultimate Snowflake Collection cookbook. I wanted something that had an easy, tasty crust (not store bought puff pastry) that required little skill, plus something that wouldn’t require me to separate eggs and fold in whisked egg whites at the end. I don’t mind making a white sauce for a base, as it was specifically the mouth-feel that I was after, but I didn’t want to use a separate pan for frying any other ingredients like onions.

The cheesy crust bakes to a golden crispy perfection all around the filling.

 

The result was the following: I used Heilie’s recipe for a press-in crust (no rolling out of dough) that involves flour, digestive bran, butter and cheese (you already know this is going to go well) and a white sauce based filling that involves stirring in a few whole eggs at the end. Into the filling went deboned flaked smoked snoek, chopped canned artichokes (you can also use canned white asparagus or mushrooms), chopped gherkins, more cheese, Dijon mustard and some parsley (use dried herbs if you don’t have fresh).  It gets baked for about 40 minutes at 180 C, filling your kitchen with the most delicious smell. It’s a deep pie, so you can use a large spoon to dish up generous helpings. Creamy, smoky, cheesy filling with a crisp bite of tangy gherkins here and there, coupled with a heavenly toasted flaky cheese crust. Serve with a crisp salad, if you want to.

This is what the press-in crust looks like before adding the filling.

 

Note: I used a round baking dish of 25 cm diameter and a depth of 5 cm. That means you can use any deep baking dish (round/square/rectangular) with a similar depth and a total volume of around 2,4 liters.

Ingredients: (makes one large pie; serves 8)

For the press-in crust: (crust recipe from Heilie Pienaar’s “Spinach & Cheese Pie” featured in The Ultimate Snowflake Collection)

  • 200 ml (110 g) cake flour
  • 125 ml (1/2 cup or 20 g) digestive bran
  • 125 g cold butter, cubed
  • a pinch of salt
  • 250 ml (1 cup) grated mature cheese like cheddar/gruyere etc. (I’ve used Dalewood’s Huguenot)

For the filling:

  • 60 ml (4 tablespoons) butter
  • 60 ml (4 tablespoons) cake flour
  • 500 ml milk
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) Dijon mustard
  • 1 ml (1/4 teaspoon) ground nutmeg
  • salt & pepper, to taste
  • 4 XL eggs, lightly beaten
  • 2-3 cups (about 325 g) boneless flaked smoked snoek (start with about 500 g snoek with bone-in; I ordered a large frozen packet from Wild Peacock Products)
  • 1 cup mature cheddar cheese, grated
  • 2 cups canned artichoke hearts/quarters, chopped into smaller pieces (or substitute with canned chopped asparagus or mushrooms, or any cooked chopped vegetables of your choice, like peas/spinach/corn/broccoli/cauliflower/courgettes etc.)
  • about 1/3 cup gherkins, chopped
  • a handful fresh parsley, finely chopped

Method:

For the crust: place the flour, bran, butter & salt in a food processor and pulse until it resembles bread crumbs. Add the cheese and process until its starts to clump together. Turn it out into a large greased baking dish of about 2-2,5 liters (I used a round 25 cm dish with a depth of 5 cm).  Using clean dry hands, press the crust evenly into the bottom and sides of the baking dish. Distribute thicker patches to cover the base and sides all over. Set aside.

For the filling: before you start, make very sure that your smoked fish is completely free of any small bones – this will take a little time, but it’s essential. Now make a white sauce: in a medium size pot over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the flour and stir for a minute. Add the milk all at once and stir vigorously with a whisk until it starts to thicken, getting rid of any lumps. When the sauce has thickened to the consistency of a medium-runny custard, remove it from the heat. Add the mustard and nutmeg and season with salt & pepper. Stir well. Add the eggs and stir very well until it’s smooth and incorporated. Add the snoek, cheese, artichokes (or veg), gherkins and parsley. Stir well, then transfer the filling into the prepared baking dish. Smooth the top. Bake at 180 C for about 40-45 minutes, or until the crust is golden brown (the top of the filling won’t brown too much). Remove from the oven and serve hot with a crisp green salad.

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How to make the best hummus, from scratch

27 Mar

Loaded hummus – image from my book Cape Mediterranean, photography by Tasha Seccombe, plates by Mervyn Gers Ceramics, background textile by Hertex.

 

Two weeks ago, I hosted 100 guests for a book conversation at the Woordfees in Stellenbosch, with the charismatic Douw Steyn of The Talking Table leading the talk. My book, Cape Mediterranean, was one of a few cookbooks being featured at the arts festival and I had the pleasure of demonstrating one of my favourite dishes from my book to the guests – loaded hummus. My hummus recipe was inspired by Yotam Ottolenghi’s hummus recipe from his book Jerusalem, and I haven’t served hummus without chopped olives, pine nuts and parsley since I’ve tasted his version.

I’ve experimented with various machines in making hummus over the last few years. From making it with a stick blender,  to a universal chopper, a small food processor and a power blender. I’ve had some luck here and there achieving very smooth results, but I’ve always been in search of a machine that could effortlessly make the smoothest hummus. I’ve since come to a few conclusions for achieving a truly smooth, creamy, silky result: 1) don’t use canned chickpeas unless you’re in a hurry and looking for an instant fix, 2) soak your chickpeas overnight in a water and baking soda mixture, 3) cook your chickpeas until very soft, 4) use a powerful food processor that has the space and capacity for the load you want to process, and 5) process it long enough until it changes to a light coloured, creamy consistency – at least 2-4 minutes.

For the book conversation and hummus demonstration, I partnered with Kenwood South Africa, where they supplied me with their top-of-the-range Kenwood MultiPro Excel Food Processor FPM910 – the largest in its capacity on the market in SA (4 liter bowl capacity). It has a very powerful motor at 1300 W and works like a dream. With standard attachments of every kind that you can possibly imagine, this is a premium addition to any serious cook’s kitchen and certainly a proud addition to mine. I had to make 8 liters of hummus in total for the tasters at my Woordfees talk and the Kenwood MultiPro Excel handled it with the utmost ease – doing double batches of this already large quantity recipe at a time, in 4 batches (plus a nut filling for 120 baklava cigars, during the height of load shedding – it was crazy!).

The Kenwood MultiPro Excel is Kenwood’s top-of-the-range large food processor with a capacity of 4 liters. Here it is on my kitchen table at home.

I made this how-to video of my recipe featured in Cape Mediterranean, showing you how to make hummus from scratch at home. Hummus is a high proteien, low carb, versatile dip/spread/topping/base – generally not expensive to make, and it freezes well. If tahini is too expensive for your budget, substitute the tahini with a teaspoon or two of unflavoured peanut butter – believe me, it adds just enough nutty flavour and works like a charm. I love topping my hummus with chopped olives, chopped parsley, paprika, olive oil and pine nuts like Yotam Ottolenghi does, but hey, it’s just as good with a simple drizzle of olive oil and a pinch of salt. Cut some carrot sticks, cucumber, or whatever you prefer to dip (yes, potato chips and nachos and sliced bread all love hummus) and call it a party.

You can order my book online for delivery after the “lockdown” period – most of the recipes are very simple and will hopefully bring you much joy. You can also order the Kenwood MultiPro Excel FPM910 from Yuppiechef at R9199 (with so many attachments I cannot even count them – also including a large capacity thermoresist blender jug and a mini grinder), they’ll also deliver after lockdown. Stay safe and look after each other±

Ingredients: (makes almost 1 liter hummus, enough to feed a crowd as a dip)

  • 250 g uncooked dry chickpeas
  • 2 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda
  • about 1 liter water, for soaking, plus more for cooking
  • 1/3-1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 30 ml extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, finely grated
  • 1/3 cup tahini (or substitute with 1-2 teaspoons unflavoured peanut butter)
  • 1/4-1/2 teaspoon ground cumin (optional)
  • salt to taste
  • 30-60 ml water
  • for topping: (optional) smoked paprika, chopped olives, chopped parsley, toasted pine nuts or toasted flaked almonds (or both), baby capers etc.

Method:

Place th chickpeas with 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda in a non-reactive bowl. Top with water and leave to soak overnight (at least 8 hours or up to 24 hours). Drain the water, then add the soaked chickpeas to a pot, along with another teaspoon of bicarb and top with water. Bring to a simmer, skimming off any scum/foam that forms on the surface. Cook until very tender, about 30 minutes. Drain and leave to cool slightly.

In a food processor, add the cooked chickpeas, along with the lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, tahini, cumin and salt. Using a powerful food processor like the Kenwood Multipro Excel, process until very smooth and creamy, adding enough water to loosen it up (about 3-4 minutes). Taste and adjust the salt if necessary. Serve swirled on a plate, topped with more extra virgin olive oil and your choice of toppings. Serve with bread or crackers or sliced vegetable sticks.

Thank you Kenwood South Africa for your continued support – I’m inspired to discover this wonderful machine in its full capacity.

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A heritage of sharing: The new menu at Pierneef à La Motte

24 Sep

The entrance leading to Pierneef à La Motte Restaurant.

 

Pierneef à La Motte Restaurant has always been about sharing. Sharing food stories and sharing food favourites. It is this personal concept of heritage cuisine that is the inspiration behind the restaurant’s new offering. Everything served in the restaurant shares a creative line from the South African food story.”

I was recently invited to experience this new offering at Pierneef à La Motte Restaurant – a refined Franschhoek destination rich with cultural heritage. After an inspiring guided tour in the La Motte Museum of the current exhibition by MJ Lourens, titled “Land Rewoven” (as a conversation with the existing collection of Pierneef’s works), we made our way to the restaurant. Chef Eric Bulpitt’s new menu invites guests to start with shared dishes inspired by the various food cultures and stories from South Africa’s rich culinary heritage – a variety of breads, spreads, salads and meats, accompanied by condiments from “Granny’s pantry” – fruit and vegetables pickled or preserved, chakalaka or chutney, kaiings or kluitjies. It’s amazing how simple items like curried beans or pickled beetroot can conjure up clear memories from my childhood – items that I despised as a child (yet it always landed on my plate courtesy of my dear Mother) but these days adore as an adult.

Keeping with the heritage theme, Pierneef à La Motte’s à la carte menu offers a choice of individually plated main courses with Chef Eric’s signature modern approach. While this menu changes regularly according to the season, availability of ingredients and the Chef’s inspiration, options might include celeriac baked in a salt crust, lowerland grains and truffle sauce (a stunning vegetarian dish that I can highly recommend), free-range pork, slow cooked for 12 hours, broad beans from their garden and pork broth, as well as wood-fire roast spring chicken brushed with fermented chilli and creamed mielies, or aged beef rump from Bonnievale with roasted shallots and baby carrots.

All dishes are offered with La Motte Cellarmaster Edmund Terblanche’s wine recommendations, available at estate prices. However, the acclaimed wine list also includes other interesting South African as well as international wine choices.

The two-course menu of a shared starter and main course costs R335 per person (wine and service fee excluded). Dessert can be ordered as an additional course at R115. The dessert menu is a trip down memory lane, revealing a legacy of nostalgic sweets in a way that charms and comforts. Decadent baked dark chocolate with chocolate biscuit and rose ice cream (reminding me of a refined combination of “bazaar pudding” and chocolate fondant), lemon meringue with lemon curd, burnt meringue and vanilla tuile, or sago pudding, honey and boerenmeisjes (probably the best sago pudding I’ve ever tasted). A selection of South African cheeses, preserves and lavash is also available.

Our lunch was the best I’ve ever experienced at Pierneef à La Motte Restaurant – I was in a state of pleasure and nostalgia by the end of our desserts which I didn’t want to end. Well done to Chef Eric and his team for hitting the flavour nails on the head.

The restaurant also offers a lighter option to enjoy after a wine tasting, mountainside hike or visit to the La Motte art gallery. Choose between the Winelands Cheese Platter or a seasonal Farm Plate – both including a glass of wine at R150 per person.

In line with the principle of heritage food, menu choices are ethical and sustainable, making use of seasonal, local and artisan ingredients.

  • Pierneef à La Motte Restaurant is open for lunch from Tuesday to Sunday, 12:00 – 15:30.
  • Reservations are recommended and can be made online, T +27(0)21 876 8800, E pierneef@la-motte.co.za
  • The charming La Motte Farm Shop hosts an array of delicious South African-inspired baking and confectionery to be enjoyed in the estate gardens or as a take-home treat.
  • Current menu (subject to change)
  • Current wine list

High ceilings and delft plate installations dominate the elegant spaces at Pierneef à La Motte Restaurant.

 

A photo wall with some of the Rupert Family’s portraits provides a personal touch.

 

Plush seats and contemporary wooden tables.

 

The delightful shared starter offering at Pierneef à La Motte Restaurant – an array of salads, bread, vetkoek, pickles, spreads and whipped beef fat.

 

La Motte’s range of wines are carefully paired with each course and comes highly recommended.

 

Celeriac baked in a salt crust, lowerland grains and truffle sauce – my choice of a main course (vegetarian). This was my dish of the day – a fantastic celebration of simple ingredients, varied textures and that luxurious base note of fresh truffles infused in the sauce. I’ll be back for more.

 

Schalk’s main course: Free-range pork, slow cooked for 12 hours, broad beans from their garden and pork broth. Exceptionally tender and delicious.

 

Schalk’s dessert: sago pudding, honey and boerenmeisjes. Take note of the glass bowl that reminds of your ouma’s house, as well as the paper doilie. This was the best sago pudding I’ve ever taste. A must on the menu.

 

My dessert: baked dark chocolate with chocolate biscuit and rose ice cream. The pudding is hidden underneatht the biscuit (see next photo).

 

Reminiscent of a dark chocolate fondant mixed with an old-school “bazaar pudding”, this dessert was exactly what I hoped it would be: warm, decadent, soft and oozing in the middle, with the delicate hit of rose water ice cream.

 

Having a quick chat to thank Chef Eric Bulpitt at the end of our meal.

 

The entrance to the charming Farm Shop at La Motte. Well worth a visit.

 

The entrance facade at La Motte.

 

Thank you to chef Eric Bulpitt and the team of La Motte for hosting us.

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How to make soft flour tortillas

31 Aug

Toast your freshly rolled-out tortillas in a hot dry skillet, for best results, then cover with a tea towel. Towel cloth by Cotton Company.

 

I’ve never been a huge fan of “wraps”. I’ve always found them to be slightly dry, and I’m more of a fan of the filling than the vehicle. More recently though, I’ve been exposed to freshly made flour tortillas. They are not only “pancakes”, they are the fluffy flattened floury cousins of great bread. It’s like they’re the brothers of roti’s. The nieces to flatbreads.

Once you’ve tasted a good, freshly made tortilla, you’ll simply be hooked.

These tortillas will stay soft as long as you leave them to steam under a tea towel, and cover for storage afterwards.

 

With a recipe that doesn’t use yeast, these beautiful staples are dependent on the quality of the flour and the working of the dough. I’ve make the decision to switch to local stone ground flour a few weeks ago, and with it came an awareness of what natural wheat flour can become. Gideon Milling is a producer with a passion for biological farming and natural flour, and I support their cause.

Flour tortillas are excellent for stuffings like spicy shredded meat, avocado (or guacamole), mayonnaise, sour cream, sliced red onion, fresh tomato, lemon/lime juice, fresh coriander and much more. Such a fresh, stunning lunch/dinner. Also doubles as a pizza base. Freezes well.

 

Here’s a simple way of using your Gideon Milling Stone Ground White Bread Flour (apart from bread, pizza etc.). With a few very simple ingredients, you can have a stack of 15 tortillas on your table, in your fridge or freezer, easy to reheat and use in so many different ways.

Kids love tortillas, and my daughter would much rather eat one of these than a store-bought slice pf bread. They contain the good proteins, the good fats, and the good carbs for growing bodies (and the healthy balanced adults). And for me who isn’t necessarily growing in height anymore, it’s just the natural, sustainable, delicious, local choice.

Try your hand at making these tortillas and let me know your thoughts and results. The original recipe is from The Cafe Sucre Farine via my good friend Tasha Seccombe – her girls were so in love with these that they now have a standing weekly tortilla dinner date at home. I suspect it will be the same in our home.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups (about 450-480 g) stone ground white bread flour
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) salt
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) baking powder
  • cup (80 ml) extra virgin olive oil (or neutral vegetable oil, but I prefer EVOO)
  • 1 cup luke-warm/warm water

Method:

Place all the dry ingredients in a large bowl and mix well (using your hands or a spoon or an electric mixer). Add the oil and water and mix to a sticky dough, then continue to mix and knead to a smooth dough – it shouldn’t take too long. Divide the dough into roughly 15 equal pieces, cover with a damp tea towel and leave to rest for at least 30 minutes. The roll each piece out on a flour surface to a sircle of about 20cm in diameter, and toast it in a hot skillet on both sides until charry & cooked. Remove from heat, stack, and cover with a dry tea towel to keep it soft.

To serve: serve warm with your choice of fillings, like shredded slow cooked meat, tomato salsa, beans, sour cream, guacamole, fresh leaves, herbs, red onion etc.

Note: These tortillas freeze very well.

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A weekend at the Robertson Slow Festival, in pictures

20 Aug

The beautiful facade of Bon Courage Estate – one of the estates that we visited as part of the Robertson Slow Food & Wine Festival 2019.

 

On the weekend of 9-11 August this year, we were invited to visit the 13th annual Robertson Slow Food & Wine Festival – a celebration of the many experiences that the Robertson Wine Valley and Route 62 has to offer. Receiving a tailor-made itinerary, our weekend experience included visits to Rooiberg, Springfield, Esona, Arendsig, De Wetshof, Jan Harmsgat, Bon Courage, Excelsior, Viljoensdrift and Rietvallei, as well as two nights accommodation at Arendsig Family Cottages.

Two years ago, we visited the same festival and was absolutely blown away by the quality of the wines, the authentic country-style hospitality, and our discovery of hidden gems in the area. This year was no different – the Robertson Wine Valley remains one of our favourite destinations in the Western Cape. This “slow” festival offers unique experiences for small groups at a time at various estates where the owners, wine makers and chefs show off their best. It is a valley filled with so much to explore and I urge you to do the same. Take a look at our weekend in pictures with some comments as captions. Our 8 year-old daughter came along on this trip, proving that it is indeed a family friendly adventure for everybody.

Rooiberg Winery is well known for their landmark massive red chair displayed next to the road – the “biggest red chair in Africa”.

 

My favourite white wine of the day at Rooiberg – their Reserve Chardonnay 2016. A full bodied, complex wine with bright fruit flavours. Splendid!

 

A tasting of all five Pinotages available at Rooiberg. They produce quite a large range of wines – there’s something for everyone.

 

 

Purchase your “love lock” from Rooiberg and fasten it to their grid for a cheeky romantic moment (or just some family fun!).

 

Next up, a stop at Springfield Estate. This is their wine tasting deck overlooking a beautiful pond and lush lawns.

 

One of my favourite wines of the day from Springfield, their unfiltered Méthode Ancienne Chardonnay 2016. Nuances of lime, Cointreau and oranges – a big wine with classical character.

 

All tastings at Springfield come with a complimentary tray of bread, olives, olive oil and balsamic vinegar. The perfect way to unwind and enjoy the beautiful views. Thank you Lana!

 

The cellar walls and doors at Springfield are incredibly beautiful – probably the most picturesque facility in the Robertson Wine Valley.

 

 

Eating a quick bite at Esona before doing another tasting – their cheese & meat platters are generous and delicious (I asked for a very small bite to eat, the bistro platter menu items are lot bigger and more varied).

 

The “Taste the Difference” experience at Esona‘s underground cellar facility, where you will experience wine, preserves, art and music. Thank you Hirchill!

 

Booking into one of the self catering family cottages at Arendsig. This rustic cottage has a built-in braai in the kitchen, two bedrooms (one twin, one double), two bathrooms and a living area. Beautiful tranquil setting right between the vineyards. Thank you Lizelle & Lourens!

 

This is the late afternoon view to the left from the cottage stoep at Arendsig Family Cottages.

 

Arriving at the spectacular De Wetshof Wine Estate for a special wine maker’s dinner. Thank you Johann & team!

 

Long table dinner preparations – waiting eagerly for the guests to be seated at De Wetshof. Food by Mimosa.

 

One of the most impressive wines of the Robertson Slow weekend: the De Wetshof Bateleur Chardonnay 2016. Simply spectacular.

 

Starter at the De Wetshof winemaker’s dinner: Teriyaki & ginger salmon tartare, zesty daikon & grilled pak choy salad, lemon grass & lime drizzle. Served with De Wetshof Lilya Dry Rosé.

 

Entrée at the De Wetshof winemaker’s dinner: Butternut squash raviola, gorgonzola, fresh herbs & sherry reduction, toasted almonds. Served with the De Wetshof Finesse/Lesca Chardonnay 2018 and 2015.

 

Main course at the De Wetshof winemaker’s dinner: Rolled leg of lamb with garlic, thyme & lime, braised honeyed baby carrots & fennel with salsa verde, golden baby potatoes. Served with De Wetshof Bateleur Chardonnay 2016 and De Wetshof Naissance Cabernet Sauvignon 2017.

 

Dessert at the De Wetshof winemaker’s dinner: Rooibos pannacotta, strawberries, caramel twirl, wild malva anglaise. Served with De Wetshof MCC 2009.

 

Welcoming the new day on a crisp Saturday morning at Jan Harmsgat Country House’s restaurant outside Swellendam.

Dishing up from the generous breakfast buffet spread at Jan Harmsgat Country House. What a great way to start the day.

 

Getting a special “breakfast dessert” from the kitchen at Jan Harmsgat – chocolate quince tart with homemade pomegranate syrup & pomegranate ice cream (leftovers from the previous evening’s special dinner). Thank you Francois, it was spectacular!

 

The beautiful wintry pecan nut groves at Jan Harmsgat. This is definitely a destination where I’d like to spend more time. Stunning accommodation facilities too.

 

Next stop: Bon Courage for some epic vintage MCC. This is their Jacques Bruére Blanc de Blanc 2011.

 

My friend Elmarie Berry tasting some limited release red wines by Bon Courage at a table next to us. Thank you Lee-Irvine for the great tasting presentation.

 

The iconic teal blue velvet interior at Bon Courage.

 

Winemaker/owner Lourens van der Westhuizen, personally presenting a tasting of his single vineyard boutique wines at Arendsig‘s tasting area. What an exceptional range of wines. Thank you Lourens!

 

Five of Arendsig‘s unique single varietal wines (separate batches individually bottled). For serious wine lovers, this tasting is a must.

 

Starter at Excelsior Estate‘s 5-course winemaker’s dinner: Smoked snoek risotto. Thank you Peter de Wet & team!

 

Main course: Lamb shank with sweet potato mash & seasonal vegetables. Part of Excelsior Estate’s 5-course winemaker’s dinner.

 

Our Sunday morning started with an adventure on the water: a tranquil boat cruise on the Breede River with Viljoensdrift River Cruises. Thank you skipper Johan!

 

A river view from the boat with Viljoensdrift River Cruises.

 

The welcoming fire place at Viljoensdrift‘s wine tasting area.

 

One of our favourite wines of the day, and perhaps best value for money at R100 per bottle: the Viljoensdrift River Gradeur Cabernet Sauvignon 2015.

 

Our last stop: visiting the pristine Rietvallei Wine Estate for a lazy lunch. Thank you Kobus, Elizabeth & team!

 

One of Rietvallei’s well-known premium white wines from their heritage collection, the JMB Chardonnay 2017. We also tasted the Cabernet Franc 2014 and it was incredible.

 

On the menu: various platters, boeries & bowls for lunch at Rietvallei. It may seem like a humble chalkboard menu, but it was probably our most delicious meal of the weekend. Absolutely scrumptious!

 

Rietvallei‘s cheese & charcuterie platter at the Robertson Slow Food & Wine Festival 2019: toasted bread, various artisanal cheeses, salami & cured sausages, cole slaw, beetroot, pickles, olives and green figs.

 

Rietvallei‘s Crazy Karoo Braai platter: Pork belly, brisket, braaied mielies, toasted bread, crispy carrots, pickles, sauces, cole slaw – an absolute delight!

 

The pristine lawns at Rietvallei, with wooden seating and umbrellas, and beautiful views. One can seriously get stuck here, in a great way!

 

Art exhibition at Rietvallei.

 

Live art happening at Rietvallei.

 

Make sure to follow the Robertson Wine Valley on Facebook for updates on their festival in 2020 – you wouldn’t want to miss out. Thank you to everyone in the valley for a fantastic weekend, we’ll be back for sure.

Contact the Robertson Slow Food & Wine Festival:

Tel: 023 626 3167

Event Enquiries: admin@robertsonwinevalley.com

Media / PR Inquiries: media@robertsonwinevalley.com

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JAN comes home to open KLEIN JAN in the Kalahari

24 May

Jan Hendrik at a bush camp fire. (Photograph supplied.)

 

Born and raised on a farm in Mpumalanga, South African Michelin-star Chef Jan Hendrik van der Westhuizen always knew he would one day return to the bush – to the campfires and the open skies of his home land. With a shared passion and vision for all things South African, a global partnership with the Oppenheimer family has led to this incredible new project that celebrates the unexplored culinary territory of the vast Kalahari.

KLEIN JAN will open its doors at Tswalu Kalahari, a first class unspoiled refuge that celebrates the simple, authentic splendours of this unique land. Driven by the values of local authenticity, heritage and sustainability of the environment, KLEIN JAN will become the place where this specific region’s culinary offering will be translated into world-class cuisine. Discovering this unexplored culinary territory with its unlimited potential has been a dream of Jan Hendrik’s for years.

In addition, JAN Innovation Studio will be opening its doors in Cape Town, where a team of chefs and students will continually develop and innovate South African cuisine. The Cape Town team will share their findings with their colleagues at Michelin star restaurant JAN in Nice, France, which will remain Jan Hendrik’s “mother ship”. In addition, South African diners can look forward to a series of pop-up dinners where they will be able to taste what Jan Hendrik and his teams have been up to.

JAN Innovation Studio will also be home to JAN the JOURNAL, a biannual publication that shares Jan Hendrik’s ideas, passion and curiosity about the culinary world. This collector’s book is available in both South Africa and in Europe.

I had the pleasure of talking to Jan Hendrik about his new plans a few weeks ago (see the video below), and to spend some one-on-one time with a young South African food icon and pioneer in his field. It was utterly refreshing to experience Jan Hendrik’s solid sense of self and his brilliant sense of humour. What a delightful conversation! I hope you enjoy the video – we shared a few light hearted moments that I’ll treasure forever.

#kleinjan #tswalu #JAN

 

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Grilled lamb skewers with lemon, honey & mustard

8 Dec

Grilled lamb sosaties with Dijon & wholegrain mustard, honey, fresh lemon juice & rind, and garlic. Photography by Tasha Seccombe.

As we are enterting festive season, most of us would just want to light a fire and spend some time outdoors with the promising smell of something amazing on the hot coals. These lamb sosaties are easy to braai and really deliver on the flavour factor – sweet and tangy honey mustard with fresh lemons and garlic.

The marinade will also work well on lamb/mutton chops, or even on chicken. Enjoy the start of your holiday (if you’re lucky enough to have some time off), put your feet up and exhale!

Ingredients: (serves 6)

1,2-1,5 kg boneless leg of lamb
juice and finely grated rind of 2 small lemons
1 garlic clove, finely grated
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons (30 ml) honey
2 tablespoons (30 ml) wholegrain mustard
1 tablespoon (15 ml) Dijon mustard
salt & pepper

Method:

Cut the lamb into bitesize cubes of about 2,5 x 2,5 cm and set aside.
Make the marinade: In a deep glass bowl of about 1,5 liter capacity, add the juice and rind of the lemons, the garlic, olive oil, honey, mustards and season with salt & pepper. Mix well, then add the meat cubes and stir to coat.
Cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a lid, and marinate for 1-3 hours in the refrigerator.
Remove the meat from the fridge and skewer the blocks on sosatie sticks to make 6 or more skewers. Braai over hot coals until charred on the outside and slightly pink on the inside. Serve hot with more lemon wedges, and a side salad or braai broodjie.

Another festive collaboration with SA Lamb & Mutton.

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